DropBox is #1 in Top 22 Cloud Storages

Last updated: November 06, 2019
DropBox
Dropbox is a Web-based file hosting service that uses cloud computing to enable users to store and share files and folders with others across the Internet using file synchronization. There are both free and paid services, each with varying options. In comparison to similar services, Dropbox offers a relatively large number of user clients across a variety of desktop and mobile operating systems.

Positions in ratings


#1 in Top 22 Cloud Storages

Alternatives


The best alternatives to DropBox are: Google Drive, OneDrive, iCloud, Box, OneDrive, Zoho WorkDrive



Latest news about DropBox


2019. Dropbox unveiled feature to send big files



Dropbox unveiled a new feature called Dropbox Transfer that allows to send large files. The maximum file size is 100 Gigabytes; files may come from the local system or may be picked directly from a user's Dropbox to speed up the sharing even further. Dropbox does not reveal if the file size will count against a user's quota on the size. Recipients download copies of the files so that originals remain untouched. Dropbox account is required to create a new file share. Dropbox notes that users who download the files don't need an account though. The new service is currently available to select customers only but will become available to all Dropbox users in the near future.




2019. Dropbox adds cold storage layer



Many people move files to Dropbox for backup purposes and then rarely access them again. So Dropbox engineers realized it made little sense to have everything stored in the same way when many files weren’t being accessed much after the first day of putting them on the service. The company decided to create two levels of storage, warm storage (previously Magic Pocket) and a new level of longer-term storage called Cold Storage, which lets Dropbox store these files less expensively, yet still deliver them in a timely manner should a customer need to see one. Dropbox customers obviously don’t care about the engineering challenges the company faces with such an approach. They only know that when they click a file, they expect it to open without a significant amount of latency, regardless of how old it is. But Dropbox saw an opportunity to store these files in a separate layer.


2019. Dropbox aquired e-signature service HelloSign



Dropbox is to acquire for $230 million HelloSign, a company that provides lightweight document workflow and eSignature services. This can also been seen in the context of the Extension capability that Dropbox added last year. HelloSign was actually one of the companies involved at launch. While Clark says the company will continue to encourage companies to extend the Dropbox solution, today’s acquisition gives it a capability of its own that doesn’t require a partnership and already is connected to Dropbox via Extensions. Dropbox is going to remain HelloSign as a standalone business within the Dropbox family.


2018. Dropbox expands Paper into planning tool with timelines



Dropbox updated Paper, its document-driven collaboration tool. It added a timeline feature, pushing beyond collaboration into a light-weight project planning tool. As you would expect with such a tool, it enables you to build a timeline with milestones, but being built into Paper, you can assign team members to each milestone and add notes with additional information including links to related documents. You can also embed a To-do lists for the person assigned to a task right in the timeline to help them complete the given task, giving a single point of access for all the people assigned to a project.


2018. Dropbox adds automatic OCR for all PDFs



Dropbox users have a useful new feature - optical character recognition that automatically transcribes all their images and PDFs. Dropbox’s text recognition engine is rolling out to Dropbox Pro, Business Advanced and Enterprise accounts over the next few months, but admins might want to check to see if they can get early access. When it comes into effect, every image and PDF you have will be scanned for text, which will be added to metadata allowing you to search for it that way. Of course, all this data will be kept as secure as the document itself. Handy, though of course much depends on how accurate the transcription is.


2018. Dropbox improves its collaboration layer - Paper



Dropbox adds some enhancements to its collaboration Paper to keep people working in it without having to switch programs. Now you can paste a number of elements into Paper and get live previews. For starters, they are letting you link to a Dropbox folder in Paper, where you can view the files inside the folder, even navigating any sub-folders. When the documents in the folder change, Paper updates the preview automatically because the folder is actually a live link to the Dropbox folder. This one seems like a table stakes feature for a company like Dropbox. In addition, Dropbox now supports Airtables, a kind of souped up spreadsheet. With the new enhancement, you just grab an Airtable embed code and drop it into Paper. From there, you can see a preview in whatever Airtable view you’ve saved the table. Finally, Paper now supports LucidCharts. As with Airtables and folders, you simply paste the link and you can see a live preview inside Paper. If the original chart changes, updates are reflected automatically in the Paper preview.


2018. Dropbox released new add-on for Gmail



Dropbox announced a new add-on to manage Gmail attachments in Dropbox. It displays the attachments in a side panel after which you can save them if you so choose directly into your Dropbox, and the experience is the same in the mobile app or on the web. Being able to access Dropbox without leaving Gmail or other G Suite tool could potentially save users time and effort spent copying and pasting and switching programs. It's a somewhat surprising partnership, as Google and Dropbox compete on the cloud storage front: Google Drive storage has many of the same features as Dropbox.


2018. Dropbox improved online file collaboration



Dropbox announced several enhancements designed to improve its mobile collabroration. In a typical team scenario, a Dropbox user shared a file with a team member for review or approval. If they wanted to check the progress of this process, the only way to do it up until now was to send an email or text message explicitly asking if the person looked at it yet — not a terribly efficient workflow. Dropbox recognized this and has built in a fix in the latest mobile release. Now users can can simply see who has looked at or taken action on a file directly from the mobile application without having to leave the application. In addition, those being asked to review files can see those notifications right at the top of the Home screen in the mobile app, making the whole feedback cycle much more organized.


2018. Dropbox implemented deeper integration with Salesforce



Two weeks ago Dropbox announced its IPO, then it announced a big partnership with Google and now it is integrating more deeply with Salesforce. It involves having Dropbox folders embedded in Salesforce Commerce Cloud and Marketing Cloud giving them a kind of light-weight digital asset management solution. For example, a company’s creative agency could create photos and other assets for a marketing campaign and store them in Salesforce’s marketing cloud. The folder is fully integrated so that if the agency changes one of the assets, which isn’t unusual, and updates their Dropbox folder, the integrated folder in Salesforce updates automatically.


2018. Dropbox adds native G Suite integration



Dropbox announced plans to partner with Google and to bring native G Suite integration to Dropbox storage. The fact is that more than 50 percent of Dropbox users have a G Suite account — which includes GMail along with Google Drive, Docs, Sheets and Slides. To this point, there hasn’t been a way to store these files in Dropbox. That has required a Google Drive account, but customer requirements can sometimes make for strange bedfellows and Dropbox and Google have been working together to bring this integration to fruition because it’s something both companies’ customers have been asking for. The integration will be completed by the end of the year. When it’s done users should be able store, open and start G Suite documents in Dropbox.


2017. Dropbox Paper gets document previews



Dropbox updated its collaboration tool Paper. Now users are able to create folders on their mobile devices and move Paper documents into them; they can now delete or archive their Paper documents on their phones; finally, users can now preview Paper documents before opening them. Dropbox is also giving developers a way to create or edit Paper documents in their own apps, which is a move that will potentially move the product outside of the bounds of the traditional Dropbox experience. Paper is increasingly popular with designers. It basically turns the process of designing and building a product spec into a living, breathing flow of information online.


2017. Dropbox updated admin panel for Business users



Dropbox is adding more features to its admin dashboard, which is part of its larger AdminX initiative. With the new AdminX, Dropbox hopes to provide a better user experience to the admins who provision accounts and set controls over who can access what. The first thing the company did was to redesign the admin console to make it simpler to use. To improve security, Dropbox is also enabling admins to manage the amount of time employees can stay logged in and access files with new web session control features. It’s also allowing admins to specify certain teams with subdomain verification. By linking certain accounts or users to a subdomain, admins can better control who can access an enterprise’s Dropbox account.


2017. Dropbox launched collaboration app Paper globally in 21 languages



Dropbox is rolling out its note-collaboration app Paper globally localized into 21 languages. It also gets some new tools that allow users to automatically generate presentations and run them through Paper in their browsers.  Paper came out in a closed beta in the second quarter last year, and then opened as a public beta in the third quarter. As it’s inched closer to launch, both Google and Salesforce in some ways have thrown their weight behind collaborative tools in a similar vein to Paper. Salesforce bought Quip for $750 million late last year. While Paper was already competing with Quip in some ways, Salesforce’s major acquisition of the company signaled that it was quickly looking to broaden its enterprise toolkit. That means that Dropbox will likely come more into direct competition in this space with Salesforce, which may be able to throw more resources at the problem than Dropbox can. For Dropbox, the hope is that its strategy of religiously tracking user behavior will be part of the edge that keeps them ahead of those larger companies.


2016. Dropbox adds PDF signing, iMessage integrations



Dropbox is updating its iOS app with few new features that should help it continue to have a toehold within larger companies. The first update is PDF signing, which allows users to open PDF files right from their mobile devices and insert signatures and text into them. Another update Dropbox is getting today is an integration with iMessage - rich file-sharing within iMessage that includes previews and the like for its users. Besides, the new lock-screen widget will give users the ability to do the most common actions you might find in a Dropbox app from the lock screen. Tapping on one of the functions will go straight to an operation within Dropbox.


2016. Dropbox adds a new dashboard for IT admins



Cloud storage service Dropbox unveiled AdminX, a new dashboard aimed at IT admins to better tailor and control their companies’ files and users on Dropbox Business accounts. Dropbox says that AdminX has been an internal initiative for a year already: and the premise is simple. While there have been admin tools on Dropbox Business ever since the product was launched, these have not seen much use. So taking a page from its own consumerization book, Dropbox has reimagined them with more intuition and simpler interfaces. At the same time, the company is preparing to launch yet more services that take it beyond basic storage: soon it plans to launch mobile device management as part of the AdminX console so that admins can use Dropbox to control not just Dropbox-based files but actual devices.


2016. Dropbox launched a new way to scan documents with your phone



Dropbox released a slew of new enterprise features. The most interesting new feature is a tool in its mobile application that allows business users to scan documents and upload them directly into Dropbox. The idea is that there is still a lot of activity and business development that happens in the real world, and Dropbox hopes to seamlessly extend that into its services. Here’s one of the more unique aspects: the company uses optical character recognition (or OCR, for short) to recognize text on the document that it’s scanning. That makes content within those documents — if it works — actually searchable inside the app. Given that Dropbox’s strength has generally been its core technology, and its quick synchronization tools, the company is clearly leaning on that in order to build a differentiated product.


2016. Dropbox will allow users to access cloud-only folders from Windows and Mac



Dropbox announced Project Infinite that is going to make managing your local computer storage and cloud storage quite a bit easier. The idea is to allow you to access your files on Dropbox right in Finder or Explorer instead of needing to navigate Dropbox's online interface. In other words, the files look like they're in your computer but actually aren't, allowing you to easily find and manage Dropbox-only files. There is no information about when this update will be coming to Dropbox or whether it will only be available to paid pro users or business users.


2015. Dropbox is shutting down its email app Mailbox



Dropbox will shut down its popular email app Mailbox on Feb. 26, 2016. The reason for closing was vague. Dropbox CEO Drew Houston and CTO Arash Ferdowsi called the decision the result of "tough choices" in a blog post announcing the news. "Over the past few months, we’ve increased our team’s focus on collaboration and simplifying the way people work together. In light of that, we’ve made the difficult decision to shut down Carousel and Mailbox." The company says it will be "using what we've learned from Mailbox to build new ways to communicate and collaborate," pointing to its note-taking app Paper, which rolled out in beta earlier this year. Mailbox was already hugely popular when Dropbox acquired it in 2013, but had been struggling to deal will the massive influx of users. It really took off after the startup was finally able to do away with its waitlist — which at one point was hundreds of thousands of users long.


2015. Dropbox allows to edit PDF files on the go



Dropbox users are now able to edit, annotate or comment their PDF files stored in Dropbox, or even electronically sign a PDF using the Acrobat Reader app,  while using iOS applications. Support for Android is set to arrive in the near future. This improved support for working with the popular file format comes on the heels of Dropbox’s partnership with Adobe, announced last month, which included Dropbox’s integration into Adobe’s Document Cloud, among other things. Before today, Adobe and Dropbox had already rolled out support for working with PDFs from the Adobe app on the desktop. That is, in addition to opening and viewing files, any edits you made to your files would automatically be saved to your Dropbox when complete.


2015. Dropbox to offer collaboration features to free users



Dropbox  is launching a new feature called Dropbox Teams, which makes it easier for people to use their personal accounts at work. The feature will be available to Basic and Pro users over the next week. Here's how it works: Users can create a team folder to keep files in one place. Group members added to the team folder will have access to all the files within that folder. Anyone added to that team will have immediate access to everything, even if they're added later on. There's also an option to link your personal and work Dropbox accounts so that you can switch from one to the other without signing out. The new feature is aimed at smaller companies that may already use Dropbox but don't pay for Dropbox for Business, which offers more advanced features like more administrative and security controls such as two-factor authentication.


2015. Dropbox acquired enterprise communication service Clementine



Dropbox has acquired Clementine, an enterprise communication service. Clementine focuses on internal communication, such as conference calls and chat services that aren’t connected to a personal phone number. It’s an important area for the workplace, given that more and more people are connecting their work software to personal devices.  Dropbox is now beefing up its enterprise services to launch a suite of products that help businesses collaborate on files like documents. Recently it launched a tool that lets Dropbox users request files from people who aren’t using Dropbox. Clementine’s services will be shutting down as part of the acquisition, according to the company.


2015. Dropbox for Windows Phone is now available



Right after Microsoft previewed Windows 10 for computers, tablets and phones, Dropbox launches an app for Windows Phone. The free app offers 2GB of Dropbox storage for new users and can automatically back up all of files on your device, just as it can for Apple iOS and Google Android. You can mark files or folders as favorites while offline and later view them when back online. You can share files or folders with a link, backup photos automatically right after snapping them, and favorite files for offline access. And if you have Dropbox accounts for both personal and business use, you can manage them separately within the app.


2015. Dropbox buys mobile office app CloudOn



Dropbox acquired Israel-based mobile productivity startup CloudOn. CloudOn claims to have nine million registered users of its service, which allows users to edit, create and share files from Microsoft Office and others online. CloudOn has ceased allowing new user sign-ups today, and it confirmed that its products will shut for good on March 2015 as its 30-person team transitions to working for Dropbox. “We’re thrilled to continue building things that help people work better — and we’re proud and excited to join the Dropbox team to help people be more productive every day,” CloudOn’s executive team wrote.


2014. Dropbox integrates with Microsoft Office



Microsoft and Dropbox announced a partnership that will see Dropbox better support Microsoft’s Office suite. The deal has four main parts: Quickly editing Office docs from the Dropbox mobile app; accessing Dropbox docs from Office apps; sharing Dropbox links of Office apps; and the creation of first-party Dropbox apps for Microsoft’s mobile offerings. No you can add your Dropbox account to Microsoft Word, Excel or PowerPoint mobile apps, navigate folders and files on Dropbox to view and edit in the native Office apps. In return, Dropbox will encourage its users to turn to Microsoft Office applications to edit and create their documents in the first place. Microsoft has another alliance with Box to ease co-existence of Office 365 and Box cloud storage and file sync software.


2014. Dropbox gives paid subscribers 1TB of cloud storage



At last Dropbox joins the cloud-storage Price War that's already almost over (Google Drive and Box already offer unlimited storage). From now Dropbox provides 1 terabyte of storage for $9.99 a month. Besides the new storage qoutes, the service added new features enabling users to add passwords for shared links and set expiration dates that will take shared files down after a certain amount of time. Users will also be able to set view-only permissions to shared folders to ensure that their files aren’t messed with by people they’re shared with. Another feature that is now available to Pro users is the ability to remotely wipe files from your Dropbox folder if your laptop happens to get lost or stolen. With new pricing and updates to its Pro offering, Dropbox is hoping to show that it can compete on price while also providing greater value to paying users through a number of new features they probably won’t find on other services.


2014. Mailbox gets a native Mac client



Popular email app Mailbox (owned by Dropbox) launches native client for Mac Desktop. Like Mailbox's mobile apps, the desktop version takes advantage of the platform's auto-swipe functionality, which learns from users' patterns to predict what they may do with individual emails. Preferences are synced with users' Dropbox accounts so the settings are preserved across devices and accounts linked to Mailbox. Another big change to the app is the addition of drafts to the iOS and desktop version. A draft is almost like a collaborative doc in your Dropbox — it's not taking up space and it's not like you can access it — but Dropbox is holding that metadata so your drafts aren't replicated a thousand times.


2014. Mailbox - email app from Dropbox


Dropbox is still the most popular cloud file storage and sharing service in spite of competition from IT giants like Google and Microsoft. What's its secret? Perhaps its main advantage - is usability. So, a year ago, Dropbox developers thought: "If we can win the storage-market with our usability, why not try to conquer the email-market?". And they acquired (for $ 100 million) the startup Mailbox, which had just the same goal. First, it worked only on iPhone (and was very popular) and recently Dropbox launched versions for Android and Mac. What's so wonderful about this application? First, it's "mobile-first". It was created with phones and tablets in mind. So many people find Mailbox touch-interface much more comfortable than Gmail or iPhone Mail. Second, the main goal of this app is fighting for the empty inbox. Mailbox lets you put off messages until later and returns them to your inbox automatically, so you can focus on what's important now. Thus, every time you check your mail - you keep your inbox empty, and your memory - clear.


2014. Dropbox fulfilled all CIOs' wishes


Dropbox has been offering the business version of its file storage and sharing service for some time. But CIOs were still unsatisfied with its enterprise-grade features and didn't allow employees to use it. On the other hand enterprise employees want to use Dropbox. That's why CIOs gave a try to Dropbox-substitutes like Box, Syncplicity, OneDrive Pro. But what employees want, it seems, is not something that provides a Dropbox-like experience; they want Dropbox. (BTW, this is told by Ilya Fushman, the head of Dropbox for Business). So, he says, I took the bull by the horns, gathered all CIOs and asked them: "What else do you want from us?". And they said: "Listen, Ilya, we want from you just three things: First - to remotely wipe accounts so that if a mobile device is stolen or lost, data could be deleted. Second - account transfer so that if someone left the company, the company’s files weren’t taken or lost. And third - audit log sharing so that companies can track where company data is being accessed." Yesterday Dropbox introduced the new version of Dropbox for Business, which fulfills all these three wishes. "Genius? Yes" - Ilya says to himself. But we did not stop and implemented the ability to safely use corporate and private Dropbox accounts on one device. So employees will be also happy with this new version.


2013. Dropbox will get down to Business. Seriously.



Dropbox co-founder and CEO Drew Houston - is very modest person. He says: "We have been serving some business users for a while ... ". In fact, Dropbox already has 4 million business customers, including 97% of Fortune 500. But now Drew promises that Dropbox will make its service really business-ready. You can see the full list of business-features on the picture behind Drew. As you can see, they include remote wipe, new sharing control, new admin panel with logs. And the major innovation - is opportunity to merge personal and business accounts. You'll be able to see both as folders on the same screen in all versions of Dropbox, and work admins will be able to watch all your activity in the business folder. "I don’t want to have to carry two phones, and this is the same thing." - says Drew.Here's an example of what the new Dropbox will look like:


2013. Dropbox launches Business-version



As you probably know, Dropbox already has been offering version for business during two years. But it's name Dropbox for Teams was not solid enough. Any large corporation wouldn't buy a product with such a name. Therefore, they decided to rename it to more serious title - Dropbox for Business. Along with the new name they added the most requested feature (by large companies) - support for Active Directory. This will allow employees to login to the service without having to enter a separate username / password, and administrators will be able to better control employee activities to ensure the security of business data. In addition to Active Directory support, Dropbox added integration with the most popular SSO (Single Sign On) services - OneLogin, Okta, Ping Identity. These services are something like SaaS-version of Active Directory. They allow employees to login to multiple online services and local applications with a single username / password.


2013. Dropbox becomes Email-provider


There was so much talk about that Email is dead. That it's an older technology that will be quickly replaced by social services. But people still use e-mail, and Google is not even closing GMail. And a couple of weeks ago a small iOS-app Mailbox appeared. It helps to quickly organize your inbox (not just in folders, but also in time). It's like a combination of email and organizer. Although Mailbox works only on top of GMail, since its launch millions of users lined up to get this app. And then Dropbox acquired it (for $100 million). The first thing that Dropbox is planning to do - integrate Mailbox with its cloud storage, so that when you attach file to a message it would be uploaded to Dropbox and a link inserted to the message. And in the near future, Dropbox, is probably going to launch this app for other mobile (and non-mobile) platforms and link it to more Email-service, or maybe launch the own e-mail service.


2013. Dropbox becomes more business-friendly



You've probably heard the term "Dropbox for Enterprise"? Most often this term refers not to the popular service Dropbox but rather to its competitors that are trying to create a similar service that meets enterprise security requirements. But Dropbox itself also wants play on the enterprise market. It provides Dropbox for Teams edition and is used by 2 million companies. However, in most cases, these are either small businesses (that have no admin) or companies in which admin is ignored. Because until now Dropbox for Teams didn't allow to take control of what happens inside the Dropbox for Teams. The new version of the service eliminates this problem. Now admin can: - See how much disk space each user is using - See all user devices and unlink them - See user's recent actions in the system - Enable / disable sharing files and folders to external users - Enable mandatory SMS-authorization - Reset / update user passwords In addition to this, Dropbox added some useful features for business users. First, it's more convenient PDF viewer in the mobile client. It lets you view PDF documents as a list of page thumbs and search in PDF's text. The second feature allows to receive push-notifications when someone shares folder with you. Dropbox for Teams costs $795 per year for 5 users


2012. Box and Dropbox implemented two-step login verification



Online file storage and sharing service Box continues to prepare for competition with Salesforce. At this time Box developers decided to significantly improve the security features. The main new thing - is two-factor authentication. If you enable it in your account, you'll receive SMS-message with security code every time you log in (just like it works in GMail). Box also added new features for business account administrators, allowing them to monitor the new files that are uploaded and shared, and receive alerts about any suspicious activity (for example, if a user starts download a lot of files at once). Another Box competitor, Dropbox has implemented the two-factor authentication back in August. And today, they added a new feature to the admin panel in business version Dropbox for Teams, that allows admin to see who on their team has turned on two-step verification, and email those who haven’t, directly from the control panel.


2012. Dropbox for Enterprise will replace SharePoint?



In this case by "Dropbox for Enterprise" we don't mean the business version of Dropbox. The fact is that the expression "Dropbox for Enterprise" has become a new meme. The largest enterprise software vendors want to release a product under the label "Dropbox for Enterprise". That's how they say: "We want to create something like Dropbox for Enterprise" (watch the video). Recall, Dropbox - is the super-popular file syncing and sharing service, which has already attracted 50 million users thanks to its simplicity and multi-platform support. It's business usage is limited due to the strict corporate security standards. But employees still tend to use it bypassing IT admins, and that is why the enterprise vendors are standing in the line to become the Enterprise Dropbox provider. The first in this line is Box.net, which has long been competing with Dropbox and has attracted already 8 million users. Like Dropbox, this service gives free gigabytes, provides sweat interface and supports multiple platforms. The next is probably Egnyte. This service also appeared long ago and was initially the most business-oriented. And this wasn't very good for competition. In particular, unlike Dropbox and Box.net - Egnyte never provided the free version. And recently the "big brothers" are coming to the line. Last week we mentioned that ECM giants Open Text and Liferay launched Dropbox clones. The other day Alfresco joined them with its Alfresco Cloud. VMware is developing its own service called Project Octopus (based on Zimbra and Mozy). Citrix has acquired the similar app ShareFile. Recently, the rumors that Google will launch its legendary service Google Drive appeared again. But the most interesting in this story - is - where is SharePoint in it? A year ago it was SharePoint - the  meme, meaning the same thing - "enterprise tool for storing and sharing files." But remember (from the first paragraph), the main reasons for the Dropbox success - simplicity and multi-platform support - that's NOT about SharePoint. This system only works in browser, on PC and Windows Phone and it's interface is not so intuitive. During the past month we didn't hear anything new about SharePoint. Microsoft pays more attention to its cloud service SkyDrive, but SharePoint (aka the most successful Microsoft's business product) may soon become a part of history.


2011. DropBox takes on Box.net with business version



The popular online file sharing service DropBox finally launches a version for business - DropBox for Teams. It differs from the regular DropBox by two things. First, it has an administrative panel to manage users and access rights. In the admin panel you can also pay for all business users. Second, when sharing files inside DropBox for Teams account, the free disk space is not decreased. (In the regular DropBox version if somebody shares for example 100 MB file to you, your disk space is reduced by 100 MB). However, DropBox wants business version users not to think about the free space at all. DropBox for Teams provides at least 1TB of free space. This is 2 times bigger than in the business version of the main competitor - Box.net DropBox for Teams pricing starts at $795 per year for 5 users, i.e. approximately $13.25 per month per user. For comparison, Box.net costs $15 per user per month. However, the DropBox for Teams functionality still lags way behind Box.net. Box.net has a lot more in the way of features for collaboration, task management, file editing, integration with other business applications. And the security features are better in the Box.net.


2009. Online file collaboration: DropBox Vs Box.Net



DropBox and Box.net - are, probably, the most popular and successful online file sharing and collaboration services. And though they use two different approaches to the SaaS file storage, they both have alike strategy, supposing constant upgrades and new features development. During the recent months both services did a good job and it's interesting to compare their results. Box.net, unlike DropBox, more persistently targets business customers. This service has more advanced security features, access control and version control tools. The basic file types in business - are office documents, that's why Box.net allows to view and edit them online (using Zoho editors). Box.net provides API for developers and that makes possible to integrate it with other business applications. Recently Box.net developers added mainstream social tools - wiki, microblogging and profiles. According to the company info, Box.net has 50000 business-customers worldwide. DropBox, like most Google services, is closer to consumer market. (BTW it's interesting that Google owns domain dropbox.com). That's why they pay more attention to interface usability, easy-of-use and personal features, especially to file sync between multiple computers. Its main advantage over Box.net is the desktop client that allows to work with files offline. But the service lacks sufficient user and version control. During September DropBox totally redesigned the web interface, improved the upload speed and unveiled the iPhone app (mobile access is also a strength of Box.net). Recently the company owners announced that they reached 2 millions users. One of the reasons of such a rapid growth is the free 2Gb subscription plan that DropBox provides to all.