Video: Facebook Workplace vs Slack


Facebook Workplace is business alternative to Facebook. Connect everyone in your company and turn ideas into action. Through group discussion, a personalised News Feed, and voice and video calling, work together and get more done. Workplace is an ad-free space, separate from your personal Facebook account.
Slack brings all your communication together in one place. It's real-time messaging, archiving and search for modern teams. Create open channels for the projects, groups and topics that the whole team shares. Slack searches whole conversations, not just individual messages, so you can find what you’re looking for no matter who said what or when they said it. Slack free open-source (self-hosted) alternatives are: Mattermost, Rocket.Chat, Zulip
Face to face in the news:


2018 - Slack added search filters - a new advantage over Facebook Workplace


Slack’s search functions are getting another little quality-of-life update with the introduction of filters, which aims to make search a little more granular to find the right answers. The company also says searches are going to be more personalized. All of this is an attempt to get to the right files or conversations quickly as Slack — a simple collection of group chats and channels that can get out of hand very fast — something a little more palatable. As companies get bigger and bigger, the sheer amount of information that ends up in it will grow faster and faster. That means that the right information will generally be more difficult to access, and if Slack is going to stick to its roots as a simple internal communications product, it’s going to have to lean on improvements under the hood and small changes in front of users. The company says search is now 70 percent faster on the back end. Thus Slack has now better search than Facebook Workplace

2017 - Facebook Workplace gets desktop app to take on Slack


Facebook has launched official desktop PC and Mac chat apps with screen sharing — two features users have been begging for. Right now, they’re only available for Workplace, Facebook’s enterprise collaboration software that competes with Slack and other business apps. Workplace has over 14,000 businesses on board paying $1 to $3 per user, and recently signed up Wal-Mart. Screensharing could help Workplace attract more clients and disrupt the clunky screen sharing of alternative apps like Skype and WebEx. It’s clear that Facebook is applying its rapid development style in an bid to conquer offices with an all-in-one collaboration app while competitors only offer a piece of the puzzle.