WhatsApp alternatives

WhatsApp
WhatsApp Messenger is a cross-platform mobile messaging app which allows you to exchange messages without having to pay for SMS. WhatsApp Messenger is available for iPhone, BlackBerry, Android, Windows Phone and Nokia and yes, those phones can all message each other! Because WhatsApp Messenger uses the same internet data plan that you use for email and web browsing, there is no cost to message and stay in touch with your friends.
Here are the latest news about WhatsApp:

11.02.17 WhatsApp enabled two-factor authentication for everyone


WhatsApp is making two-factor verification possible for all of its one billion plus users. By using a passcode to verify your phone number it decreases the likelihood a WhatsApp account can be accessed by a third party. WhatsApp, which has been heavily criticised for sharing user information with the Facebook family of companies, says providing it with your email address will allow for two-step verification to be turned off if the passcode is forgotten. WhatsApp says two-step verification is an optional feature. To turn it on, make sure you have the latest version of the app, and go to Settings. From settings, visit account, then two-step verification and press enable.



2016 WhatsApp launches video calls



Facebook-owned chat service WhatsApp is launching video calling for its over 1 billion users worldwide on iOS, Android and Windows Phone. To use the new feature, WhatsApp users can hit the call button in the top right corner of a conversation, which will bring up an overlaid interstitial asking if you want to voice or video call the friend or family member you’re chatting with. To kick off the video call, you simply select the “video call” option from this screen. With video calling, WhatsApp is belatedly catching up with a number of rivals, including Facebook’s own Messenger app, for example, as well as Skype, Apple’s FaceTime, Viber, LINE and Google’s recently launched Duo, to name a few.



2016 WhatsApp launched desktop version for Mac and Windows


WhatsApp has launched desktop clients for Mac and Windows. People who have already been using WhatsApp on their web browsers will find that software isn’t significantly different. The desktop app is an extension of your phone app, with all messages synced between devices. Giving power users who rely on WhatsApp for work communications, desktop options helps it competes against other messaging services, like iMessenger, WeChat, and Skype. WhatsApp is currently testing out B2C accounts, which would give it a new revenue source after dropping its 99 cent annual subscription fee.



2016 WhatsApp now supports full end-to-end encryption


Facebook owned messenger WhatsApp has now fully implemented strong end-to-end encryption on its platform and across all mobile platforms for which it offers apps. End-to-end encryption means the content of communications are not stored in plaintext on WhatsApp’s servers. Nor is the company able to decrypt users’ messages to access them since it does not hold the encryption keys. So WhatsApp will be unable to be compelled to hand over messaging data — even if served with a warrant by authorities demanding access. WhatsApp partnered with Open Whisper Systems and has integrated its widely respected end-to-end encryption Signal Protocol. Although the completion of default end-to-end encryption is a hugely important security milestone for the WhatsApp platform, it does not mean that from here on in every communication sent via the app is end-to-end encrypted, because that’s reliant on all users being upgraded to the latest version of the software.



2016 WhatsApp will go free and add features for business


Whatsapp has announced it will drop its subscription fee, making the service free for everyone. And it won't start showing third-party ads to users. Instead, it will add features to better connect users with business and organizations. That could mean communicating with your bank about whether a recent transaction was fraudulent, or with an airline about a delayed flight. Whatsapp wants to charge organizations and business for establishing channels with their users through the service Whatsapp, which has been acquired by Facebook for $16 billion in Feb. 2014, currently has "nearly" 1 billion users, according to the post. Facebook CEO and co-founder Mark Zuckerberg said on several occasions he expects the service to hit that milestone, at which point it would become ripe for monetization.