Evernote alternatives

Evernote
Evernote is a suite of software and services designed for notetaking and archiving. Evernote supports a number of operating system platforms (including Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Android, iOS and WebOS), and also offers online synchronization and backup services.
Here are the latest news about Evernote:

2016 Evernote limits free plan to 2 devices and raises prices


Note-taking app Evernote introduced new pricing policy. The Basic plan remains free, but is now limited to only two devices. That might be sufficient for the average user — Evernote likely wouldn’t deliberately rankle a majority of their free users — but it’s still a considerable limitation. The addition of the passcode lock feature to Basic helps soften the blow, though. Plus, which was $3 per month, now costs $4 (or $35 per year), while Premium went from $6 to $8 per month, or $70 per year. You get 1GB and 10GB, respectively, in those plans, and the specifics of what’s offered (too much to list here) can be found at the Evernote site.



2016 Evernote unveiled new Windows app



Evernote has unveiled a major update of its desktop client for Windows users. The new release provides another user interface revamp and some new features. Notebooks and tags can now be directly accessed, created and deleted from the left-hand pane, which can be minimized to free up screen real-estate elsewhere. Users also gain the ability to define notebooks and tags by color (right-click to do this) for easier identification in the left-hand pane. Business account users now see their personal and business notes visually separated out, with the ability to choose what’s displayed. Mixed note lists have been dropped. Keyboard shortcuts make it quick and easy to toggle between personal and business mode. The new version also comes with the promise of increased stability and performance - search in particularly runs much quicker.



2014 Evernote rolls out built-in chat


Online note-taking and collaboration service Evernote has rolled out a new “Work Chat” feature to its web and mobile applications which allows users to discuss ideas and projects directly in the Evernote interface itself, instead of having to shift those conversations over to email. Additionally, when you email a note to someone, it will now show up in Work Chat automatically, allowing you to keep a permanent history of your communications. You can chat with either just one person, or a group, and you can optionally sync the app with your Google Contacts, too. When you start a chat with another user, they’re notified both in the app and via an email message that informs them of the chat and offers a button which, when clicked, launches Evernote.



2014 Evernote unveiled AI tool and new web interface


The most popular note-taking Evernote wants people not just keep using its app to store notes and thoughts regularly, but to use it for ever more purposes: it’s launching Evernote Context — an AI play that will see it surfacing and suggesting new content to you from third party sources as you read and write. This will mean adding a new content feed from third party sources that will appear within Evernote, alongside and relevant to the work that you are doing within the app, wether you are on desktop or another client. Also Evernote unveiled new web app that uses a lot more white space throughout the interface, leaving you with a much cleaner workspace that doesn’t draw your eye to past notes as you add new ones to the same extent as you’d fine the native desktop app.



2014 Evernote and LinkedIn integrate business cards into social network



Business card scanning apps were already on the market for some time (i.e. Evernote). They rescue business people from card-full wallets, but don't solve another problem: contacts may change over time. Fortunately, this problem is solved by social networks (especially LinkedIn), where people update their own contact information, and it's automatically updated in their friends' address books. A few days ago LinkedIn integrated with Evernote. Now you just make a photo of business card and your smartphone immediately shows you the person's LinkedIn profile.  You're then given the option to connect with that CEO, secretary or digital prophet on LinkedIn or add their contact info to your address book. However, things get interesting as your business relationship blossoms. Over time, you can add things like audio from a meeting, documents, or even key emails with him or her to the card's page in Evernote.