Amazon Web Services vs Google Cloud Platform


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Amazon Web Services
Access a reliable, on-demand infrastructure to power your applications, from hosted internal applications to SaaS offerings. Scale to meet your application demands, whether one server or a large cluster. Leverage scalable database solutions. Utilize cost-effective solutions for storing and retrieving any amount of data, any time, anywhere.
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Google Cloud Platform
Google Cloud Platform is a set of modular cloud-based services that allow you to create anything from simple websites to complex applications. Cloud Platform provides the building blocks so you can quickly develop everything from simple websites to complex applications. Explore how you can make Cloud Platform work for you.

Latest news about Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud Platform:



13.03.17. Google Cloud Platform improved its free tier. Google launched an improved always-free tier and trial program for its Cloud Platform. The free tier, which now offers enough power to run a small app in Google’s cloud, now allows for free usage of a small (f1-micro) instance in Compute Engine, Cloud Pub/Sub, Google Cloud Storage and Cloud Functions. In total, the free tier now includes 15 services. The addition of the Compute Engine instance and 5GB of free Cloud Storage usage is probably the most important update here because those are, after all, the services that are at the core of most cloud applications. You can find the exact limits here. With this move, Google is clearly stepping up its attacks against AWS, which offers a similar but more limited free tier program for its users.



02.02.17. Google Cloud Platform takes on Windows Azure with new Windows VMs. Google announced several new products today aimed at luring IT pros who are using Windows in their data centers to the Google Cloud Platform. The company introduced support for Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise and Windows Server Core on the Cloud Platform. In addition, the company announced support for SQL Server Always-On Availability Group for customers who are concerned about high availability and disaster recovery when running critical operations in a cloud setting. What this means in practical terms is that IT pros can now launch pre-configured virtual machines running any of these products on Google Cloud Platform, and pay for them by the minute — or they can bring an existing SQL Server license they have already paid for.



12.01.17. Google Cloud Platform gets a new key management service. Google Cloud Platform is launching a new key management service, that will help enterprises, especially in regulated industries like healthcare and banking, to create, use, rotate and destroy their encryption keys in the cloud. Enterprises have traditionally managed their keys on-premise, but as they have slowly moved more of their workloads to the cloud, they have also started thinking about how they can manage their keys in the cloud, too. With the AWS Key Management Service and Azure Key Vault, Amazon and Microsoft have long offered a similar tool, for example, and even Google itself already offered a more basic version of Cloud KMS for users who wanted to supply their own encryption keys.



24.10.16. Google Cloud Platform gets new a cold storage service. Google launched Coldline - a new cold storage service for data archiving and disaster recovery (an alternative to Amazon Glacier). Google Cloud Storage already offered the similar service Nearline. But when Nearline came out of beta earlier this year, it also became much faster. Instead of three to five seconds of latency, access to data was now real-time. So, Coldline basically fills the gap that the improved Nearline service left after it came out of beta. Coldline storage will only cost $0.007 per gigabyte per month (and $0.05 per gigabyte retrieved). Nearline costs $0.01 per month. That may not look like a huge difference, but those numbers quickly add up if you are storing massive amounts of data.



20.11.15. Google launched custom machine types for its Cloud Platform. Google Cloud Platform launched a new way of buying virtual machines in its cloud - Custom Machine Types. With new Custom Machine Types, Google lets you specify exactly how many vCPUs (up to 32) and how much memory you need (up to 6.5 GiB per vCPU — Google likes to be precise, so it doesn’t use ‘gigabyte’ and instead specifies the number of gibibytes). If your needs change — as they inevitably will — you can adjust the number of cores and memory as needed. Maybe you’ve outgrown the virtual machine with two vCPUs. Typically, you would have to step up to a machine type with four vCPUs, even if you only needed three. Because you don’t have a choice, you end up paying for more power than you need.



31.01.15. VMware will make Google Cloud Platform available to its customers. Google is teaming up with VMware to make select Google Cloud Platform services available to VMware customers via vCloud Air, VMware’s hybrid cloud platform. Google BigQuery analytics and Google Cloud Storage, as well as Google’s Datastore and DNS services, will be available via vCloud Air sometime later this year, with other Google services potentially coming later. Depending on execution, both companies can claim a win here. VMware gets four Google services, including the powerful BigQuery analytics, to woo enterprise customers. Google gets to put some of its best and brightest IP in front of the enterprise cloud users it craves. Google needs a better hybrid cloud picture and VMware needs to prove its cloud can play with the big boys (or boy, meaning Amazon Web Services).



24.01.15. Google Cloud Platform now allows to store Docker container images. Google announced the beta launch of the Google Container Registry for its Cloud Platform. This new service allows developers to host, share and manage their private Docker container repositories on the company’s cloud computing platform. By default, Docker offers its own public images registry so developers can quickly install anything from a basic unadorned Ubuntu machine to servers that have already been set up to run WordPress, mongoDB, Hadoop or virtually any other server package you can think of. Many businesses have no interest in publishing their containers to a public repository, of course. They can run their own private repositories or use services like Quay.io that offer this feature as a cloud-based service. At its core, that’s what Google’s Container Registry does, too, but with a focus on Google’s own cloud computing platform.



12.12.14. Google Cloud Platform now supports server-side software for Windows. Google introduced Microsoft License Mobility for Google Cloud Platform that means Google’s customers can move their existing Microsoft server application software licenses (SQL Server, SharePoint, Exchange Server, and so on) from on-premises to Google Cloud Platform without any additional Microsoft software licensing fees. This makes the transition to Google’s cloud easier, and it also lets customers who prefer to purchase perpetual licenses to continue to do so. Besides Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter Edition is now available to all Google Cloud Platform customers in beta on Google Compute Engine. This option can be interesting for enterprises that want to mitigate risk in the cloud, and move some of their workloads from Azure to an alternate platform – in this case, Google cloud.



15.11.14. AWS now supports Docker containers. Amazon announced the preview availability of EC2 Container Services – the new service for managing Docker containers that boosts Amazon Web Services support for hybrid cloud. This bring the benefits of easy development management, portability between environments, lower risk in deployments, smoother maintenance and management of application components, and the ability for it all to work together. AWS isn’t the first cloud provider to offer Docker’s open source engine support. Google has extended its support for Docker containers with its new Google Container Engine powered by its own Kubernetes, announced just last week during the Google Cloud Platform Live event. And, back in August, Microsoft announced its support for Kubernetes in managing Docker containers in Azure.



05.11.14. Google Cloud Platform slashes prices, adds containers, VPN support. During its Cloud Platform conference Google announced new products for its Google Cloud Platform. The first - service called Google Container Engine that lets businesses move from managing application components running on individual virtual machines to portable Docker containers that are scheduled into a managed compute cluster for you. Another addition is App Engine with auto-scaling support, Cloud SDK integration and support for runtimes built on Docker containers. Other rollouts include carrier interconnect with partners like Verizon and VPN support, starting in early 2015. This will let users keep apps and data in-house and using the public cloud for other tasks.  Google also slashed the prices for its Cloud Platform that should make both large and small-scale business partners happy. In addition to a 10% drop in pricing last month, here's a look at the latest cuts: BigQuery Storage falls almost 25%; PD Snapshots is down about 80%. Meanwhile, Disk SSD storage is cut nearly in half; and the price of large Cloud SQL instances dropped 25%.



07.04.14. Don't like cloud pricing? Wait a minute. According to the latest news, you need to wait just around 5 days before prices of cloud computing services will substantially drop. On March 26 Google announced price cut for Google Compute Engine (by 32%)  and Google App Engine (by 30%). And the cost of Google's cloud storage was reduced by as much as 68% (up to $0,026 per month per 1 GB). In 24 hours, Amazon responded - reduced the price of EC2 virtual machines by 30-40%, and the cost of S3 data storage - by 60% (down to $0,024 per gigabyte). Microsoft was very busy in recent days, so it reacted only after 5 days. Microsoft cut Windows Azure prices so that they were either identical or slightly lower than Amazon's. These three providers (Amazon, Microsoft and Google) reduce the cloud pricing so often that other players (IBM, Oracle, Rackspace, HP) simply can't take part in this cloud arms race, and the open cloud platform OpenStack also can't get the considerable market share.



31.01.14. Amazon and Microsoft drop cloud prices. Cloud computing is becoming cheaper and cheaper. So, if you once (for example, a year ago) calculated whether it was cost-effective to migrate your IT infrastructure to the cloud and decided that it was still expensive, then recalculate again. Since then, cloud platform reduced prices two or three times. Another round of happening now. Since tomorrow  Amazon S3 cloud storage pricing will decrease by 6-22 % (depending on the used space), and the cost of cloud server hard drives (Amazon EBS) will fall by 50%. And a month later Microsoft's cloud platform Windows Azure  will reduce its prices by 20% to keep them a little lower than Amazon's. So think once again, why buy an in-house server if the cost of the cloud tends to zero.



2012. Top 5 Enterprise 2.0 stories of 2012. What are the most memorable trends on the Enterprise market in 2012? Have our 2011 forecasts come true? Here are the top 5 most important (in our opinion) Enterprise 2.0 events and trends of 2012:



2012. Google and Amazon reduce cloud storage prices. Launch new cloud services. Competition - is good for customers. On Monday, Google reduced prices for its Google Cloud Storage by over 20%, and today, in response, Amazon has reduced prices for its S3 storage by 25%. Obviously, in the near future, Microsoft will also reduce prices for Windows Azure, to bring them to the competitive level - about $0.09/month per GB. The same story occured in March when Amazon lowered prices, and then Microsoft and Google aligned their pricing with Amazon. Because on the cloud platforms market the price is no longer a competitive advantage, but your pricing is higher than the competition - is't a big disadvantage. Some experts already doubt that Amazon and the contenders are earning something on selling gigabytes and gigahertzs. Like in case with the mobile market, the main task of cloud vendors - is to hook up large companies and SaaS-providers to their platforms, even if they should sell computing resources at a loss.



2012. Amazon Glacier: Cloud storage service using Humanoid robots. Humanoid robots - is just our assumption, but it's first idea, that comes to mind when looking at the new service Amazon Glacier. This is a solution for the long-term storage of archives and backups, which are needed for business very rare, or may be never used, but should be stored because of some state or corporate guidelines. The point is that storing data in Amazon Glacier is very cheap. Only 1 cent per month for 1 GB (10 times less than in the Amazon S3). But if you want to get any file - you need to order it first and wait 3-5 hours until it becomes available. (We think that during this time the robot can find the hard drive in the data center and bring it to the control panel). In addition, Amazon Glacier customers will be able to download only 5% of their data per month and will pay $0.12 per GB for data transfer exceeding 1 GB per month.



2012. OpenStack launches. CloudStack departs. Amazon adapts SAP. Azure rebrands. Here is the news digest from the leading cloud platforms. First of all, the open-source platform OpenStack (aka Linux for the clouds) which had been developed for two years by the alliance of IT giants (Rackspace, NASA, Citrix, Intel, AMD, Cisco, Dell, HP, IBM ...) - finally comes to production. Since May 1, it was adapted by RackSpace for its service Rackspace Cloud Files and last week HP launched the public beta of its HP Cloud platform, based on OpenStack. However, a week before the launch the trouble (common for open-source projects) occurred with OpenStack. Citrix, which has been one of the first participants in OpenStack, suddenly decided to grant its own cloud platform - CloudStack - to Apache Software Foundation. Thus, CloudStack not flowed into OpenStack but became a rival project. Citrix explained this decision by the slow OpenStack development and unwillingness of other parties to integrate with Amazon Web Services APIs.



2012. AWS Marketplace - cloud app market for Amazon's platform. Better than anybody in the world Amazon can build online stores, so the launch of the cloud app store for Amazon Web Services platform - is very logical move. The question may be only one: what's the point of creating software store for AWS, if AWS can host almost any software in the world? The fact is that AWS Marketplace sells not software but software images, specially created for the AWS (so-called AMI = Amazon Machine Images). Each image in addition to the software contains everything it needs to run (operating system, middleware). And you can install such AMI on Amazon's server with just one click. You do not need to configure the software - everything works out-of-the-box. Thus, developers and IT administrators need less and less brains to start using Amazon's cloud platform. You just need to create an account, go to the app store, add to cart needed software (from the operating system to CRM system) and that's all.



2012. Amazon wants to beat Google in the Enterprise Search. Enterprise search engines (which are used mostly by large companies with large data stores) - have always been the prerogative of the large software vendors: SAP, Oracle, IBM, Open Text. Then, of course, the search giant Google came to party and became market leader. But now Google and company will face a new competitor. Amazon is launching a new service on its cloud platform - CloudSearch. At first glance, it seems that Google has nothing to fear. Even though Amazon developers have some experience in search technologies (they somehow developed a search engine for the online store and even launched the own search engine A9). But how can they compete with Google? The problem is that existing enterprise search engines, including Google Enterprise Search, are designed for work in local networks, on local servers. And as corporate data moves to the cloud, they become useless.



2012. So Amazon is #1. And who’s next in cloud computing?. GigaOm has published the list of top 7 cloud providers besides Amazon. Why besides Amazon? Because Amazon Web Services for now is far ahead of competitors. AWS is an absolute cloud market leader in all reports of all analytical firms. According to various estimates, AWS runs on 450,000 servers and generates about $1 billion in revenue per year. And who's next? Here are the top 7 the cloud providers by GigaOM:



2012. Amazon - gets closer to Windows, OpenStack - closer to Linux. The situation on the cloud (IaaS) platform market more and more reminds us the history of the desktop operating systems (Windows and Linux). On the one hand - open and standard-based platform OpenStack. It's standards this week were supported by two more giants - IBM and Ericsson, that joined the OpenStack alliance. Before them the alliance included Rackspace, Citrix, Intel, AMD, Cisco, Dell, HP. On the other hand - proprietary but already very popular platform Amazon Web Services (AWS). AWS gained it's popularity as a simple and open platform which allows to restore Linux or Windows server and scale it depending on the load. It was relatively easy to move applications of AWS. But as Amazon adds new features to AWS, it lockes clients and partners more and more in its golden cage.