Top 4 Google App Engine alternatives

Last updated: August 24, 2017
Google App Engine
Google App Engine lets you run web applications on Google's infrastructure. App Engine applications are easy to build, easy to maintain, and easy to scale as your traffic and data storage needs grow. With App Engine, there are no servers to maintain: You just upload your application, and it's ready to serve your users.

The best Google App Engine alternatives:



Heroku



Amazon Web Services



Microsoft Azure



Rackspace





Latest news about Google App Engine


2017. Google App Engine gets a firewall



Google App Engine is finally getting a fully featured firewall. Until now, developers couldn’t easily restrict access to their applications on the service to only a small set of IP addresses or address ranges for testing, for example. Instead, they had to hard-code a similar solution into their applications and — because those requests would still hit their applications in some form — even those rejected requests would still incur costs. Now, they’ll be able to use the Google Cloud Console, App Engine Admin API or even the gcloud command-line tool to set up access restrictions that block or allow specific IP addresses. Because the firewall obviously sits in front of the application, rejected requests never touch the application and App Engine never needs to spin up an idle resource only to then reject the request.




2017. Google App Engine now supports all programming languages



Google launched the new version of its platform-as-a-service for building application backends App Engine.The big news is that App Engine now supports any programming language, so a developer can create the app in whatever language they are comfortable using. Google sees this as a game changer, making the platform more open, which is a big theme with the company as it transitions to try and lure enterprise customers to Google Cloud Platform in general. In the previous version there was a limited set of runtime libraries and once you built an application, it was very difficult to take it out of Google. The company has indicated that part of its philosophy on being open means making it easy to move and avoid lock-in, even if that means leaving Google Cloud Platform.


2013. Now you can use Google App Engine to host your company website



Google App Engine added support for PHP - the language on which 90% of websites are created. So now you can move your corporate website to this cloud platform. Why is it better than the regular hosting that you currently use? First, GAE provides free quotas: 1GB for file and data storage and 1Gb of traffic per day. So for most small business websites this hosting will be free. For large companies that have websites with big attendance - the cost would be almost the same as with regular hosting. But with GAE they can be sure that their sites work reliably, because GAE - is the platform on which Google's own services work and it can withstand heavy loads and even natural disasters. In addition to website hosting, the PHP support on Google App Engine may help to grow more SaaS services. Because now the large army of PHP-developers will get the opportunity to start for free and attract customers with the reliable platform.


2013. Google Compute Engine is available for all


Google launched its cloud IaaS platform Google Compute Engine a year ago, and then we called it the very strong competitor for Amazon Web Services. But the problem was that during this year the platform was available only for selected users (who paid $400/month for Google's Gold-support). Yesterday Google Compute Engine has become available to everyone, so let's get ready to rumble. With the public launch Google has added several new features. In particular, advanced routing - to create gateways and VPN servers, and enable you to build applications that span your local network and Google’s cloud, support for PHP in Google App Engine. Unlike AWS, Google introduced per-minute billing for the virtual servers (instead of per-hour). The pricing starts at $0.02/hour for a shared-core server. The video shows how you can create linux-server with the required parameters in 30 seconds on Google Compute Engine.


2011. Google killed App Engine for Business



Last month, at the Google I/O conference, Google announced changes in GAE pricing, and caused panic among the developers. Without going into details, we'll just say that the developers initially incorrectly calculated the new fees, and only after Google's clarification post, it became clear that the prices would jump, but not so much. However, in the shadow of this panic another small announcement was unnoticed - the enterprise version of Google App Engine, launched a year ago - was closed. This does not mean that Google is no longer positioning its PaaS platform for business. Most of the features of the enterprise version (99.95% SLA, support for SSL, SQL, Spring framework) will be soon implemented in the basic version. However, this means that Google has done a lot of mistakes with the PaaS platform and currently loosing the game in competition with Microsoft, Salesforce, Amazon, VMWare. And, strange enough, that the main reason of Google's failure in this sphere is the proprietary technologies of its platform. It supports only Google's own database - Big Table, and only 3 languages (Python, Java and Google's own language - Go). Thus, applications built on GAE can be hardly moved to any other cloud platform (so the developer stick to one platform), and the existing applications should be rebuilt to be moved to GAE. Unlike Google App Engine, the competing platforms (especially VMWare's Cloud Foundry) tend to provide developers with standard, open technologies and let them port their applications to other platforms.