Search Engines for Business

Updated: October 17, 2019

2019. AlphaSense, a search engine for business, raised $50M


AlphaSense, which provides a way for companies to quickly amass market intelligence around specific trends, industries and more to help them make business decisions, has closed a $50 million round of funding, a Series B that it’s planning to use to continue enhancing its product and expanding to more verticals. One interesting aspect of AlphaSense is how it’s both focused on pulling in requests as well as set up to push information to its users based on previous search parameters. Currently these are set up to only provide information, but over time, there is a clear opportunity to build services to let the engines take on some of the actions based on that information, such as adjusting asking prices for sales and other transactions. The company counts some 1,000 clients on its books, with a heavy emphasis on investment banks and related financial services companies.


2014. Google rebranded its business products


Usually Google doesn't use to rename its products all the time, like Microsoft. But this time they decided to take this step and renamed the group of business services Google Enterprise with Google for Work. From now Google Apps is called Google Apps for Work, the enterprise search engine - Google Search for Work, etc. Why did they do this? Eric Schmidt, Google's chairman, explained this rebranding with the change of the way how people work now. Previously, people worked only in the Enterprise-cubicles, where their computers with business programs were installed. Now they can Work anywhere using cloud applications. In addition, Google is now positioning (or selling) its services not as tools for Enterprises, but as tools for people that help them to do their favorite Work.


2012. Amazon made an atempt to beat Google in the Enterprise Search


Enterprise search engines (which are used mostly by large companies with large data stores) - have always been the prerogative of the large software vendors: SAP, Oracle, IBM, Open Text. Then, of course, the search giant Google came to party and became market leader. But now Google and company will face a new competitor. Amazon is launching a new service on its cloud platform - CloudSearch. At first glance, it seems that Google has nothing to fear. Even though Amazon developers have some experience in search technologies (they somehow developed a search engine for the online store and even launched the own search engine A9). But how can they compete with Google? The problem is that existing enterprise search engines, including Google Enterprise Search, are designed for work in local networks, on local servers. And as corporate data moves to the cloud, they become useless. The situation is even more difficult because the fact that now very often the phrase "move to the cloud" means "move to Amazon". Thus, enterprise search is going away from Google and comes to Amazon. Google's own cloud platform Google App Engine - for now can't compete with Amazon Web Services on the enterprise market. Besides the search engine for Google App Engine is still only in the plans. It is worth noting that Amazon CloudSearch has a fundamental difference from the Google Enterprise Search. Google's corporate search engine is a plug-n-play box that connects to LAN, indexes all data silos and displays results. CloudSearch - is not a ready-to-use service, but rather a tool for developers, which allows them quickly implement search in enterprise applications and repositories and configure it for the individual needs. CloudSearch cost depends on the number of search servers, requests and traffic. But in general such search-as-a-service will cost much cheaper than buying and maintaining an own in-house search server.