Lightweight browsers


2018. Google Chrome gets a fresh look, better omnibox, and more



Google Chrome is rolling out a revamped design and a slew of new features, including a more powerful omnibox. Now it has more rounded corners and a new color palette. The shape of the tabs makes site favicons easier to see so you can navigate them better. And on iOS, where Chrome has been sorely neglected for a long while, the toolbar finally goes to the right place — the bottom of the screen, closer to where your thumbs are. There are new customization features, too. For the "new tab" screen, you can easily change the background image as well as the site suggestions. Autocomplete gets a overdue upgrade: you'll see favicons of sites in the drop-down, and Chrome will now show answers to some queries right in the autocomplete list, even before you hit Return.


2017. Firefox released new ultra-fast web browser to take on Google Chrome


Mozilla's latest browser Firefox Quantum is really, really fast. In a test conducted with the open-source project WebPageTest, Firefox Quantum loaded a number of top websites before Chrome did, including Yelp, Shutterstock, Ask.com and even Google Search itself.  (Chrome was still, of course, faster to load most Google and Youtube pages).  The browser also uses around 30% less memory than its competitors Chrome, Edge, and Safari on Windows operating systems, and only uses a tiny bit more than Chrome on macOS. This means you can run 30% more tabs without your browser crashing or slowing to a crawl.  But where the company hopes its browser will stand out the most is in the interface. The company extensively researched the way users navigate browsers, and Firefox Quantum has a number of small, but significant features to accommodate those patterns.


2015. Google to stop supporting Chrome for Windows XP and Vista



Google announced  the end of Chrome support for Windows XP. Starting April 2016, users who still use Chrome on XP will no longer get updates and security fixes. Ending XP support is not a massive surprise, but as Google also announced today, Windows Vista and Mac OS X 10.6, 10.7 and 10.8. will also no longer be supported “since these platforms are no longer actively supported by Microsoft and Apple.” Google, Microsoft and others have long continued to support their software on some of these old platforms long beyond their useful life because they often became vectors for viruses and malware — and with unpatched versions of Chrome or Internet Explorer running on them, they would have become even more dangerous.


2015. Windows 10 will have a new Browser that is not Internet Explorer



According to ZDNet’s Mary Jo Foley, Microsoft is building a lightweight browser, codenamed Spartan. And isn’t Internet Explorer but maintains use of Internet Explorer’s rendering engine. Her post notes that it could be set free inside of the Windows 10 release. If Microsoft wants Windows 10 to function across all platforms and wants developers to be able to develop once and deploy everywhere, then creating a new browsing experience that is built to handle all sorts of inputs — without the baggage of a traditional desktop browsing experience — would be a decent idea. The Windows 10 release date is set for mid-2015, with the consumer edition preview now firmly pegged for January 21.