Headless CMS

Updated: July 01, 2020
Whereas a traditional CMS typically combines the content and presentation layers of a website, a headless CMS is just the content component and focuses entirely on the administrative interface for content creators, the facilitation of content workflows and collaboration, and the organization of content into taxonomies.

2020. Nacelle raises $4.8M for its headless e-commerce platform



Nacelle, the startup that bills itself as a JAMstack for e-commerce, has raised about $4.8 million. Nacelle builds an easier path for e-commerce brands to embrace a headless structure. Headless web apps essentially mean a site’s front end is decoupled from the backend infrastructure, so it’s leaning fully on dedicated frameworks for each to deliver content to users. There are some notable benefits for sites going headless, including greater performance, better scalability, fewer hosting costs and a more streamlined developer experience. For e-commerce sites, there are also some notable complexities due to how storefronts operate and how headless CMSs need to accommodate dynamic inventories and user shopping carts.


2020. Contentful raises $80M for its headless CMS



Headless CMS company Contentful has raised $80 million Series E funding. Currently, 28% of the Fortune 500 use Contentful to manage their content across platforms. The company says it has a total of 2,200 paying customers right now and these include the likes of Spotify, ITV, the British Museum, Telus and Urban Outfitters.


2020. Commerce Layer raises $6M for its headless e-commerce platform



Commerce Layer, which has built a “headless” e-commerce platform — used to develop online sales strategies that use APIs to plug your inventory to take orders and payments from a variety of endpoints like other marketplaces, your own site and app (and the various payment systems you might use depending on the country you’re selling into), messaging services, social channels, and more — has raised a Series A of $6 million. Customers of Commerce Layer include Chilly’s (the fashionable water bottle company), Au Depart, Richard Ginori and more, who Conforti says help shape what his startup builds next: for example one of its customers wants an integration with Farfetch, the high-end fashion marketplace, and so they are building that to subsequently offer it as an option to others.


2019. Headless CMS company Strapi raises $4 million



French startup Strapi that develops open-source Node.js headless content management system has raised a $4 million. Strapi has become quite popular in the headless CMS space, with 500,000 downloads and 250 contributors to the open-source project. Anybody can download Strapi and run it on their own server. You can then develop your front end, fetch content in your mobile app using the Strapi API and more. Strapi lets you customize the admin panel so that you only see the fields you need when you add content. It works with SQLite, MongoDB, MySQL and Postgres databases. The company plans to build an ecosystem of plugins to expand the features of your CMS installation. Eventually, the startup could launch a hosted version of Strapi so you don’t have to manage the server infrastructure yourself.


2019. Contentstack raises $31.5M Series A round for its headless CMS platform



Contentstack, a startup that offers a headless CMS platform for enterprises, today announced that it has raised a $31.5 million Series A. The company says that it saw its revenue grow by 4x in the first half of 2019 compared to the same time period last year. The company tells that it is getting traction across industries, but retail, travel/hospitality, sports/entertainment and tech are doing especially well. Like most companies at the Series A stage, Contentstack says it will use the new funding to scale its sales and marketing team and build out its partner ecosystem and community around the product. Sampat also tells me that the company plans to expand beyond its core regions of the U.S., India and Europe by moving into the APAC region in the first half of 2020, mostly with a focus on Australia and New Zealand.