Desktop Office software

Updated: October 19, 2019

2018. Microsoft launches Office 2019 for Windows, macOS



Office 2019 is the next on-premises version of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, Project, Visio, Access, and Publisher. In PowerPoint 2019, you can create cinematic presentations with new features like Morph and Zoom. And improved inking features across the apps in Windows—like the roaming pencil case, pressure sensitivity, and tilt effects—allow you to naturally create documents. Excel 2019 adds powerful new data analysis features, including new formulas and charts and enhancements to PowerPivot. Word 2019 and Outlook 2019 help you focus on what matters most. Learning Tools, like Read Aloud and Text Spacing, make it easier to engage with your content. Focus Mode blocks out distractions and puts your content front and center. And Focused Inbox moves less important emails out of the way.


2018. Microsoft Office gets the new-old design



Microsoft begins rolling out subtle changes to the Office.com and Office 365 designs in order to make them look simpler and less cluttered. The biggest change by far is coming to Microsoft Word, where the toolbar at the top of the screen (officially dubbed "the ribbon") will be pared down to just one line. Fans of the classic design will be able to expand it back to the larger ribbon if they choose. The changes fit in with Microsoft's overarching Fluent Design language, which can be found across most parts of Windows 10. The updated ribbon will also include new animations, icons, and a few small color changes. Microsoft is delaying the rollout of the simplified ribbon to desktop by a few months. The company appears to be testing the new designs with the online apps and will take a look at feedback to see if any other changes should be made for the desktop versions.


2017. Apple makes iWork free



Apple rolled out updated versions of its iWork suite, making it free for all customers on both platforms. Many customers already had free copies of these apps, as they came free with new Mac or iOS devices. The pricing change, however, removes the requirement to have bought new Apple hardware to get the apps for free. This expands the apps’ reach to anyone using Apple devices, even if they never bought new or are using older devices. iWork is actually a suite of productivity apps — Numbers, Keynote and Pages — meant to rival Microsoft Office and Google Docs.  Prior to the price change, the Mac versions of the iWork apps were $19.99 and the iOS versions were $9.99 apiece for those customers who hadn’t bought a new device in the past few years.


2015. Microsoft released Office 2016


Microsoft is releasing Office 2016, offering refreshed versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint and other applications. The look and feel of the programs will be familiar to anyone who has used the 2013 edition of Microsoft’s productivity software. Much of what’s new with the 2016 edition is better integrated collaboration tools. A new co-authoring feature allows multiple users to edit the same document in real time, long a feature of Office’s Web-based cousins and apps built by Google and other Microsoft competitors. Also arriving is chat service Skype, which will be embedded within Office apps to let users send instant messages, share images of their work, or video chat from within a document. Other new features include a search tool to locate specific functions within Office, and a research tool that pulls data from the Internet into documents. Microsoft is pushing to sell the software suite through Office 365, the company’s subscription program, instead of the traditional model of a one-time purchase that gives the user rights to the software in perpetuity.


2013. New collaboration tools in ONLYOFFICE and LibreOffice



Microsoft recently launched the new Office 2013 and as usual with the release of new version there is a number of frustrated users that consider switching to competing products. So now is the best time for Microsoft rivals to push their office-suites. TeamLab (that recently became an "Office") added real-time collaboration feature. Now you can see who is working on a document at the moment, which paragraph he is editing and communicate with co-workers in comments and chat. You can even invite for co-editing users that are not registered in TeamLab. So TeamLab is now like Google Apps - they even set the same price $50/year. Only in Google Apps it's the price for 1 user, while in TeamLab - for 5 users. By the way, TeamLab's pricing is changed again: there is single edition and no free version. The new version of LibreOffice 4 (the offspring of OpenOffice) was developed by much more people than TeamLab (after all, it's an open-source project). But it doesn't feature considerable updates. And there is no more talks about the promised mobile and cloud versions. As usual, among the new features they claim the better support for MS Office formats. But in fact, formatting in a little more complicated documents distorts. At leats they added support for CMIS standard, that allows to collaborate on LibreOffice documents in different document management systems (Alfresco, Nuxeo, OpenText, etc.)