Cybersecurity platforms

Updated: November 22, 2020

2020. FireEye acquires AI security expert Respond Software for $186M



Cybersecurity company FireEye has acquired Respond Software, a company that helps customers investigate and understand security incidents, while reducing the need for highly trained (and scarce) security analysts. FireEye had its eye on Respond’s Analyst product, which it plans to fold into its Mandiant Solutions platform. Like many companies today, FireEye is focused on using machine learning to help bolster its solutions and bring a level of automation to sorting through the data, finding real issues and weeding out false positives. The acquisition gives them a quick influx of machine learning-fueled software.


2020. Hunters raises $15M for its AI-based threat-hunting platform



Hunters, a Tel Aviv-based cybersecurity startup that helps enterprises defend themselves from intruders and analyze attacks, has raised a $15 million Series A funding round from Microsoft and other investors. The company’s SaaS platform basically automates the threat-hunting processes, which has traditionally been a manual process. The general idea here is to take as much data from an enterprise’s various networking and security tools to detect stealth attacks.


2020. Axonius nabs $58M for its cybersecurity-focused network asset management platform



Axonius, a New York-based company that lets organizations manage and track the range of computing-based assets that are connecting to their networks — and then plug that data into some 100 different cybersecurity tools to analyse it — has picked up a Series C of $58 million. The company has had a huge boost in business in the last year, however — especially right now, not a surprise for a company that helps enable secure remote working, at a time when many businesses have gone remote in an effort to follow government policies encouraging social distancing to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.


2020. Intezer raises $15M for its DNA-style approach to identifying malware code



Israeli startup Intezer, which has built a way to analyse, identify and eradicate malware by way of an ordering system similar to what’s used when mapping out DNA — has raised $15 million. Intezer describes its technique as “genetic malware analysis”, and the basic premise is that all software, whether legitimate or malicious, is comprised of previously written code. Intezer can “map” out different malware, making connections by detecting code reuse and code similarities, which in turn can help it identify new threats, and help put a stop to them. There is a reason why cybercriminals reuse code, and it has to do with economies of scale: they can reuse and work faster. Conversely, it also becomes exponentially harder for them to launch a new attack campaign since they would need to start completely from scratch.


2019. VMware acquired cybersecurity platform Carbon Black


VMware has acquired Carbon Black, a publicly traded security company that focuses on securing modern cloud-native workloads. The price of the acquisition is about $2.1 billion. Carbon Black provides the security features necessary to secure modern applications and infrastructures. The idea is to seamlessly integrate Carbon Black’s cloud-native endpoint protection platform into all of VMware’s control points. This type of bold move is exactly what the IT and security industries have been looking to see for a very long time.


2019. Cybersecurity platform Confluera snaged $9M


Confluera, the startup that wants to help companies protect themselves in the face of an onslaught of attacks, announced a $9 million Series A investment led by Lightspeed Venture Partners. The company’s solution watches across the customer’s infrastructure, finds issues and recommends ways to mitigate the attack. The platform has visibility across the infrastructure, and uses security information from multiple sources to make that determination of where the attacker currently is and how to mitigate that. It’s early days for Confluera, as it has 19 employees and three customers using the platform so far. For starters, it will be officially launching next week at Black Hat. After that, it has to continue building out the product and prove that it can work as described to stop the types of attacks we see on a regular basis.


2019. Microsoft Defender comes to Mac



Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) is coming to the Mac. Previously, this was a Windows solution for protecting the machines of Microsoft 365 subscribers and assets of the IT admins that try to keep them safe. It was also previously called Windows Defender ATP, but given that it is now on the Mac, too, Microsoft decided to drop the “Windows Defender” moniker in favor or “Microsoft Defender.” There are plenty of enterprises that use a mix of Windows machines and Mac, and which provide all of their employees with Office already. Having a security solution that spans both systems can greatly reduce complexity for IT departments — and keeping up with security vulnerabilities on one system is hard enough to begin with.


2016. Cisco acquired cybersecurity-as-a-Service provider CloudLock



Cisco announced it plans to acquire (for $293 million) CloudLock, a cloud-based security provider that uses APIs to let enterprises apply and monitor security on documents and other content that they share and store in cloud-based applications. CloudLock works with Office365, Google Drive, and Salesforce applications, among thousands of other apps and software. Its focus is on offering security and enforcing policies to protect documents, regardless of device used to access it, and allowing for specific controls based on location.