Cloud backup services

Updated: April 13, 2019

2019. AWS launches fully-managed backup service for business


Amazon’s AWS cloud platform has added a new service Backup, that allows companies to back up their data from various AWS services and their on-premises apps. To back up on-premises data, businesses can use the AWS Storage Gateway. The service allows users to define their various backup policies and retention periods, including the ability to move backups to cold storage (for EFS data) or delete them completely after a certain time. By default, the data is stored in Amazon S3 buckets. Most of the supported services, except for EFS file systems, already feature the ability to create snapshots. Backup essentially automates that process and creates rules around it, so it’s no surprise that the pricing for Backup is the same as for using those snapshot features (with the exception of the file system backup, which will have a per-GB charge).


2017. CrashPlan shuts down its consumer cloud backup service to focus on business version



Popular cloud backup service CrashPlan announced that it would stop selling home subscriptions in order to focus on business version - Code42. Customers have a little bit more than a year to find an alternative. Companies like CrashPlan, Backblaze and Carbonite have made online backup easy. After subscribing, you just have to install a background app and forget about it. These services usually back up your data continuously in the background. CrashPlan has been one of the leading services in this space, but it turns out that you can make more money by focusing on bigger customers. That’s why Code42 is giving its customers a lot of time to move away from CrashPlan. It can take a while to upload an entire hard drive, after all.


2015. Backblaze offers low-cost Amazon S3 rival



Backblaze, the company known for its consumer and enterprise backup service, is taking a step in a slightly different direction by announcing Backblaze B2, a competitively priced cloud storage service that competes with the likes of Amazon S3 and the cloud storage services that are part of Microsoft Azure and Google’s Cloud Platform. The price of Backblaze’s service is half the price of Amazon Glacier, AWS’s very slow cold storage service, and only costs about a fourth of Amazon’s regular S3 service. Maybe you want to store your data in a number of different locations and services, but if you did that on AWS, you would spend twice as much as you do today. Given Backblaze’s low prices, you could now store an extra copy of your data for about 15 percent of the price you’d pay on Amazon’s cloud storage service. The company expects that users will use Backblaze B2 to store images, videos and data sets, for example. Backblaze B2 will offer a free tier (up to 10GB storage, 1GB/day of outbound traffic and unlimited inbound bandwidth). Developers will be able to access it through an API and command-line interface, but the service will also offer a web interface for less technical users.


2014. Datto buys cloud backup service Backupify



Datto is buying Backupify so it can offer a full range of data recovery services, regardless of where that data sits. Both companies deal with data backup and recovery, but Backupify’s strength is protecting SaaS objects — data in Google Docs or Salesforce.com — while Datto focuses on protecting Windows and Linux applications running either on premises on physical servers or on local or private clouds. Backupify had raised just under $20 million from investors including Avalon Ventures, General Catalyst Partners, First Round Capital, Lowercase Capital, Symantec and others. Datto has raised $25 million in one round led by shared investor General Catalyst — it was former VMware CTO Steve Herrod’s first funding deal after he joined that VC firm.


2014. Bitcasa ends unlimited storage plan



Cloud storage and backup service Bitcasa, that became well-known with low cost unlimited storage offer is scrapping this option entirely — claiming it’s not being used enough to justify the high costs of dealing with a small group of what it dubs Terms of Service abusers. The choices facing unlimited users of Bitcasa wanting to continue using its service are to drop down to a 1TB premium plan, costing circa $99 per year, or pay $999 for a 10TB pro plan. Since Bitcasa has increased the storage capacity of its pro plan — from 5TB to 10TB (to better accommodate those exiled from the land of unlimited storage) it has also increased prices for that plan. The monthly price was $49 and is now $99 for new subscribers.


2012. Amazon Glacier: Cloud storage service using Humanoid robots



Humanoid robots - is just our assumption, but it's first idea, that comes to mind when looking at the new service Amazon Glacier. This is a solution for the long-term storage of archives and backups, which are needed for business very rare, or may be never used, but should be stored because of some state or corporate guidelines. The point is that storing data in Amazon Glacier is very cheap. Only 1 cent per month for 1 GB (10 times less than in the Amazon S3). But if you want to get any file - you need to order it first and wait 3-5 hours until it becomes available. (We think that during this time the robot can find the hard drive in the data center and bring it to the control panel). In addition, Amazon Glacier customers will be able to download only 5% of their data per month and will pay $0.12 per GB for data transfer exceeding 1 GB per month.