Business News reading apps

Updated: December 29, 2019

2018. Microsoft launched AI-based news reading app Hummingbird



Microsoft launched a new AI news app for Android called Hummingbird. It allows to register an account with your hotmail or Linkedin email address. The benefits of logging in with an account is Microsoft being able to serve you news item that are populated with articles that they think you’ll be interested in. Just like other AI-powered services, the more you use it, the better it will understand you and your preferences. When you tap on an article, it will open in the original site but you will still see the Hummingbird title bar if you go to the reading mode so you can easily go back to the app’s main page. There are options to mute specific genres of news sources, so you can keep your feed centered around your interests, such as tech reviews or books. If there is something you are really keen about, there are social media sharing options, natch.


2018. Google News gets AI-redesign



Google introduced a revamped version of Google News that now merges with Google Play Newsstand. The A.I.-powered, redesigned service combines elements found in Google’s digital magazine app, Newsstand, as well as YouTube, and introduces new features like “newscasts” and “full coverage” to help people get a summary or a more holistic view of a news story. The updated version will present a briefing at the top of the page with the five stories you need to know about right now, as well as more stories selected just for you. The feature uses A.I. technology to read the news on the web, to assemble the key things you need to know about, including also local news and events in your area. And the more you use this personalized version of Google News, the better it will get, thanks to the “reinforcement learning” technology under the hood.


2015. LinkedIn redesigns its news app Pulse



LinkedIn launched a redesigned version of its news app Pulse for iOS and Android, taking a more curated approach to surfacing news stories — a major departure from the app's previous approach to news delivery. The previous version of Pulse had a more RSS-like model, with a nearly endless stream of stories from all the publishers you followed. The new Pulse features a cleaner design, which is more in line with LinkedIn's other apps. The home page of the app now displays a feed of personalized stories based on data from your LinkedIn profile. The app uses information like your job title, industry, company and connections to surface stories it thinks will be most relevant to you. The publishers you followed on the previous version of the app will be taken into account in Pulse's recommendations.


2013. LinkedIn acquired Pulse. Wants to become the primary source of business news


News-reading has become the hot topic after Google's announcement about the death of Google Reader, and it's likely that in the coming months we'll hear a lot of loud news from this market. The first has come from the business-oriented social network LinkedIn that is buying (for $90 million) the mobile news reader Pulse. If you don't know how Pulse works - watch the video. When you first start it - it asks to choose your topics of interest, and then immediately shows you the top news on these topics from the most popular sources. Then you can configure your own news pages and add the sites you want to track. The feed selection is not so flexible as in RSS-reader, but you'll get more pictures and have to think less. Pulse generally takes the news from the same RSS feeds, which it finds on the sites. Pulse alternative news apps are Flipboard, Instapaper and Google Currents. And of course, the question is - why LinkedIn needs it? LinkedIn's target audience - is businessmen and executives. And LinkedIn knows that these guys - are perhaps the most active news readers. On the other hand, they (or rather their companies) are the main sources of business news. So LinkedIn wants to be in the middle of this looped circle of news distribution and consuming.