Video: Task management software Asana launched Workload to help prevent burnout

August 08, 2019


Asana, the task management platform, launched Workload, a new feature for its paying users that aims to help prevent burnout. It does so by making it easier for businesses to fairly distribute work across their teams and, if necessary, redistribute it. The general idea behind Workload is that it provides a central view of how much more work any given team can currently handle. Team members can customize their own workload based on criteria like points or hours and, maybe most importantly, set capacity limits. It’s no secret that burnout is a major problem and, according to Asana’s own research, 80% of global knowledge workers say they consistently feel overworked and close to burnout.

Speaking about Task Management software it's interesting to remind that:

Earlier this year Microsoft brought its To-Do app to Mac:



Microsoft is bringing its To-Do app to the Mac. It will support most of the core features right away, including the ability to create and manage tasks, work offline, share lists, utilize tags and more. It also will integrate with Microsoft Outlook to pull in your “Flagged” email list and will support integration with Planner soon, allowing you to see any items assigned to you. The Mac version also takes advantage of its new platform to offer a handful of keyboard shortcuts, like ⌘2 to minimize the app so it only displays the list view, and ⌘1 to return to viewing all your lists. You can click on a task’s text to edit it directly from the list view, as well.


Last year Slack added Actions feature for deep integrations:



Slack has introduced a new feature called "actions," which takes Slack's existing third-party app integrations to the next level. It lets developers hook their apps even deeper into the chat service so you can do more without ever leaving the app. Instead of the automated experiences developers can create now, actions lets you start using outside services directly from Slack messages. If your company uses the task management software Asana, for example, you can create and assign a new task right from your chats. Or, if you use Zendesk, you can create support tickets directly form a message.


Last year Google released Google Tasks mobile app:



Google introduced a new app that ties into its suite of productivity applications: Google Tasks. The app offers you a dedicated place to create, view and edit your task list and to-dos, including those created from within the new Gmail or from Google Calendar.  The app itself is a fairly standard take on to-do lists. You can create and manage your task list in the app, and break down tasks into subtasks. The drag-and-drop interface lets you prioritize your tasks, and you can set a “due date” for reminders on those you don’t want to forget. What makes the app worthwhile is that you’re able to trace a task back to its source email in Gmail, and view them on your Google Calendar.


In 2016 Todoist applied machine learning to predict your task due dates:



Popular task management service Todoist wants to help you reschedule your task and even out the work load using machine learning. There’s a new “Reschedule” button next to the overdue section. The service intelligently suggests new due dates for all these overdue tasks based on many different data points. It also works with unscheduled tasks. Todoist learns from you. For regular tasks, such as errands, Todoist remembers when you usually complete these tasks and assign them to the same day. You might also have a ton of upcoming tasks, so Todoist will make sure that all tasks are distributed evenly so that you can actually get stuff done. Todoist also knows when you stop working when you stop completing tasks. So the service won’t suggest to reschedule due tasks to today if it’s already late.


In 2016 Asana added Custom fields:



Task management app Asana  is introducing a new product called custom fields, that will let you tailor Asana’s information management to cover a variety of structured data points. As Asana describes it, a company that, for example, might have been conducting a recruiting drive can now use Asana to create a form to track more details about actual candidates; a marketing team can now drill down into a larger plan to track specific campaigns; engineering teams can use it to record and monitor bug tracking; and design teams can use it to provide more detailed looks and updates about larger projects. The company also will be integrating custom fields into its API.  It means that you could, theoretically, come up with new applications of it that expose Asana even as a customer-facing tool to instantly gather and start structuring information.