NetSuite vs QuickBooks

Last updated: December 05, 2017

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NetSuite
NetSuite is the leading vendor of cloud-based Software-as-a-Service integrated business management software for mid-market enterprises and divisions of large companies. NetSuite's cloud business management system including ERP / accounting, order management / inventory, CRM, professional services automation (PSA), and Ecommerce.
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QuickBooks
QuickBooks Online puts you in control of your finances, your time, your business—and where you work. From setup to support, QuickBooks Online makes your accounting easy. With simple tools to get you started, free support, and a money-back guarantee, QuickBooks Online is the effortless choice.
NetSuite vs QuickBooks in our news:

2017. Intuit acquired time-tracker TSheets



Intuit, the company behind products like QuickBooks, acquired TSheets, a time-tracking service and employee scheduling app with over 35,000 customers for $340 million. There’s an obvious overlap between the markets for QuickBooks and TSheets, both of which mostly target small to medium businesses. Indeed, Intuit tells us that the companies already share 12,000 customers. Clearly this isn’t a play to acquire new customers, but to build out the QuickBooks ecosystem and it’s worth noting that TSheets already offers an integration with QuickBooks. In talking to Intuit over the last few months, this idea of removing friction is very much at the heart of the company’s current product plans, especially with regard to QuickBooks.


2016. Oracle buys cloud ERP provider NetSuite for $9.3B


Oracle will acquire NetSuite for about $9.3 billion. Both Oracle and NetSuite’s cloud service offerings aimed at enterprise customers will continue to operate and “coexist in the marketplace forever,” according to a statement by Oracle CEO Mark Hurd. Eighteen-year-old NetSuite claims a dominant position in the cloud enterprise resource planning (ERP) space, which includes offerings to help businesses track supply and demand, inventory, accounting, customer relationships (CRM) and HR. The ERP industry has been an active space for M&A and general consolidation over the past few years, and Oracle in general has been an aggressive acquirer of smaller companies throughout 2016, with recent pick-ups including Opower and Textura.


2014. Intuit acquired cloud integration service ItDuzzit



Intuit continues to build out its cloud platform for SMB by acquiring itDuzzit — the startup that provides tools for businesses to integrate different web and mobile apps with each other (something think IFTTT for enterprises). The idea here is that Intuit will add itDuzzit to its QuickBooks platform, which provides accounting and increasingly many other adjacent services to businesses. ItDuzzit competes against the likes of Zapier and Cloudwork. The dozens of apps that can be linked up using the itDuzzit include the likes of Asana, Box, Coinbase, Freshbooks, PayPal and Shopify, with promises of further apps to come. What it essentially means is that while Inuit may not have its own hand in each of those pies (yet), it will give its customers an easy way of using them on its platform and with Intuit software regardless.


2010. NetSuite fights hairballs. But makes one with Google Apps



NetSuite marketing team is well known for its sense of humor. But before their humor was mainly inspired by SAP and its "stealth" launch of SaaS solution SAP Business ByDesign (that let NetSuite make its business). By the way, it's interesting that actually NetSuite drives away Oracle's customers as well as SAP's, but with respect to Oracle, the NetSuite marketers behave much more modest, because the Oracle CEO, Larry Ellison in co-owner of NetSuite. But let's go back to hairballs. What is it? According to NetSuite, the hairball - is a thing that happens when a company deploys disparate IT systems and then tries to integrate them. The conclusion is simple - use NetSuite, where everything is natively integrated. In addition to funny video NetSuite unveiled the updated system interface and seamless integration with Google Apps:


2009. Netsuite invented Social ERP



Netsuite has already missed the opportunity to use the Social CRM buzz. Salesforce and some other CRM vendors have already unveiled social features and launched the marketing promotions. But Netsuite has all chances to become the first to offer Social ERP. Today Netsuite and InsideView announced about the new partnership in order to create the Social ERP. But why do we need this social ERP software? Everything was clear with social CRM: salesperson needs to monitor customers and leads in the social networks in order to involve into the discussions and sell something. But why ERP, that  is intended for resources accounting and planning, needs the similar features? Netsuite has found some answers to this question.


2008. Intuit launches QuickBooks Online Edition



Intuit is the biggest player in the accounting software space, its QuickBooks product having massive following in the SMB space with over three millions users. QuickBooks Online Edition (QBOE) is its response to the growing popularity of web-based and online accessible offerings. Available now for several years, QBOE has had slow, but steady, uptake. QBOE does some of the major things that businesses need. It's got full double-entry accounting, allowing for correct balance sheets, profit and loss statements and trial balances to be run from it. The starting point for QBOE is the home screen. Unlike other online accounting apps which try and depict a "dashboard view" is where their business is at, the QBOE home screen is more a process diagram, showing a workflow style diagram that allows the user to dive into different functional area of the accounting system. The Basic edition covers the bare essentials - accounts receivable, expense tracking and check printing, arguably quite limited functionality for $10 a month. The Plus version adds estimates and invoice customisations, time tracking, recurrent billing, budgeting and online billing to the mix.


2008. Accounting on the go: Quickbooks for iPhone and Blackberry



Quickbooks, one of the leading accounting packages for small businesses, has just released web interfaces for Blackberry and iPhone. The iPhone version, seen to the left, sports a very slick UI and allows easy, at-a-glance access to all of your financial information, entered into Quickbooks Online. At first glance, the web app provides a simplistic view of things. Features included are looking at who owes you, who you owe, vendors, employees, and bank accounts. Despite the initially simplistic look, as you drill down, you uncover a whole new level of detail. Even though this seems to be a killer app for referring to your financial information, I have to point out some points where they have missed the mark. First off, a standalone app, available through the App Store would have been nice for the iPhone, but it's not completely necessary. The largest oversight here is not being able to edit or add data. In my opinion, this would be one of the primary usage scenarios for this app. That said, this is version one of this app and we may see this sort of functionality being added at some point down the line.  If you are already a Quickbooks Online user, these new web interfaces for Blackberry and iPhone are nice perks. I'm not sure that the introduction of these apps would be the deciding factor in jumping to Quickbooks Online, but it might help the decision.


2004. NetSuite updates customer management tools

 NetSuite, a provider of hosted customer relationship management software, plans to debut an updated version of its services that aims to give users more powerful tools to sort data. NetSuite 10.0 offers analysis tools to help businesses predict information about their customers based on data they have already entered. The San Mateo, Calif., "software as a service" company believes that many standalone CRM systems have failed to deliver real insight into customer behavior. Rival business software packages revolve around data related to internal sales processes, the company said. NetSuite is able to integrate data taken from multiple applications partly because its tools exist in a single architecture. That allows CRM, enterprise resource planning (ERP) and e-commerce processes to be managed in a single database, Nelson said. In addition to selling all the applications in one package, NetSuite's CRM and ERP products are sold individually.