JBoss Portal vs Liferay Portal


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JBoss Portal
JBoss Enterprise Portal Platform meets the demands of internal and external end users who require access to, and interaction between, back-end applications, SOA services, and Web 2.0 applications. Based on an open, reliable framework, JBoss Enterprise Portal Platform meets the development and operational demands of the smallest tactical mashup style application, as well as the largest mission-critical web sites.
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Liferay Portal
Liferay Portal is an alternative enterprise web platform for building business solutions that deliver immediate results and long-term value. Liferay Portal ships with broad product capabilities to provide immediate return on investment: Content & Document Management with Microsoft Office integration, Web Publishing and Shared Workspaces, Enterprise Collaboration, Social Networking and Mashups, Enterprise Portals and Identity Management
JBoss Portal vs Liferay Portal in our news:


2016 - Liferay launched Digital Experience Platform



Open source enterprise CMS provider Liferay launched Digital Experience Platform (DXP) - the solution is designed to help companies create and manage experiences that support the end-to-end customer relationship. It offers a comprehensive view of customers that extends beyond marketing by bringing together sales, marketing, support and service teams, design highly personalized experiences by targeting useful information, offers and resources to user segments and individuals, create a single customer profile aggregated from all of the customer’s interactions with the company as well as important data points, access to engagement data such as video content views, click-throughs on targeted content, community activity and social metadata.

2015 - Liferay partners with Red Hat to provide an open source portal solution



Liferay and Red Hat are collaborating on an open source portal that combines Liferay Portal and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (JBoss EAP). The product is targeting companies that want more open-source, enterprise grade portal options, the companies maintain. To that end, there is the potential of additional integration with other Red Hat JBoss Middleware products in the near future. From a company perspective the deal is an interesting one in that Red Hat stopped offering new subscriptions to JBoss Portal in February 2015. Red Hat is continuing support for JBoss Portal through the current release stream, which is scheduled to end in March 2018. This new venture represents, one could conclude, Red Hat's ongoing commitment to the portal market.

2012 - Open Text and Liferay create Dropbox clones



Could you imagine couple of years ago that such serious enterprise vendors like Open Text and Liferay, that develop such a serious enterprise content management systems (ECM) will copy such a simple consumer service as Dropbox? Nevertheless, it happens. Because even in large corporations (that use ECM) employees are ordinary people. And they also don't want to work for the system, but want the system to help them work. And they also use Dropbox, even if IT administrators prohibit it. There is only one way out - to create the same (simple) service and protect it with firewall. This is the very idea behind the new services: Open Text Tempo and Liferay Sync. They allow to sync files between desktop folder, web account, tablet and smartphone, quickly share files with co-workers, and they work on corporate servers. That's simple.

2006 - Why IBM passed on JBoss acquisition to strike back at Liferay Portal


IBM considered acquiring open-source Java middleware company JBoss, but chose to go a different route for the both financial and technical reasons. Now Oracle and JBoss are rumored to be in negotiations over a JBoss acquisition. The price tag for such a deal is reported to be between $200 and $400 million. Like Oracle, IBM has a closed-source line of Java middleware called WebSphere. In May last year, IBM purchased Gluecode, a small company with less than 15 employees which was building a support business around the Apache Geronimo project, an open-source Java application server.  The roots of Gluecode are at JBoss. A small group of developers left their employment at JBoss in 2003 to start the Apache Geronimo project. Apache Geronimo was certified to meet the Java 2 Enterprise Edition standard in October last year. IBM has rebranded Gluecode as WebSphere Community Edition. It sells support services around the software primarily to smaller businesses.

2004 - JBoss airs expansion plans. SharePoint is in panic

 Open-source company JBoss is looking to expand into integration and business process automation software, potentially through acquisitions, a company executive said Friday. The company is evaluating a plan to purchase an existing infrastructure software, or middleware, company and make its product available for free under an open-source license. Other expansion options include taking over an existing open-source project or writing its own integration and process automation software. The company could use some of the $10 million it gained from venture capital investors to finance acquisitions. JBoss makes money by offering services and training for a handful of freely available infrastructure software products, notably its JBoss Java application server, which is used to run business applications written in Java.