Carbonite vs Druva


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Carbonite
Carbonite is an online backup service, available to Windows and Mac users, that backs up documents, e-mails, music, photos, and settings. Carbonite keeps small businesses and home offices running smoothly. We offer a comprehensive suite of affordable services for data protection, recovery and anytime, anywhere accessibility. From running your small business to running your household, our goal is to provide secure and affordable cloud backup for all your files.
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Druva
Druva delivers secure backup as a service to the cloud across endpoints, servers and cloud applications, with integrated workflows, global deduplication, and deep search and data analytics capabilities making data protection and information management simpler, safer and more cost effective.
Carbonite vs Druva in our news:


2019 - OpenText buys online backup firm Carbonite for $1.42B



Carbonite has agreed to a $1.42 billion purchase by OpenText, an enterprise information management giant. During the last couple of years Carbonite moved away from a traditional data backup business to a more proactive, defensive security company. In February, Carbonite bought endpoint security company Webroot for $618.5 million in an all-cash deal, as the company pushed to protect against emerging threats like ransomware. Only a year earlier, Carbonite bought Mozy for $145 million, a cloud backup service.

2017 - Cloud data management startup Druva raised $80M to take on CrashPlan



Druva, which has built a platform that provides backup and data protection for some 4,000 business networks’ various endpoints, infrastructure and apps as of today — has raised $80 million to double down on providing data management and protection for companies that have built networks that use public cloud platforms, going head to head with the likes of EMC, Commvault and Veritas, as well as other data management startups like Rubrik. This latest round brings the total raised by Druva close to $200 million. As a point of comparison, one of its competitors Rubrik is now valued at $1.3 billion after raising $180 million earlier this year. And Druva’s valuation was last estimated to be around $637.5 million at its last round ($51 million in 2016), and the company tells me it has grown over 300 percent in the last year, with some of its customers including Continental, Emerson, Flex and Fujitsu. So Druva can be trusted more than CrashPlan.