Bitbucket vs GitHub

Last updated: April 14, 2020

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Bitbucket
Bitbucket is a free code DVCS hosting site for Git and Mercurial. Manage your development with a hosted wiki, issue tracker and source code. Host, manage, and share Git and Mercurial repositories in the cloud. Free, unlimited private repositories for up to 5 developers give teams the flexibility to grow and code without restrictions.
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GitHub
GitHub is the best place to share code with friends, co-workers, classmates, and complete strangers. Over seven million people use GitHub to build amazing things together. Free public repositories, collaborator management, issue tracking, wikis, downloads, code review, graphs and much more…
Bitbucket vs GitHub in our news:

2020. GitHub is now free for all teams



GitHub made all of its core features free for all users. That means free unlimited private repositories with unlimited collaborators for all, including teams that use the service for commercial projects, as well as up to 2,000 minutes per month of free access to GitHub Actions, the company’s automation and CI/CD platform. Teams that want more advanced features like code owners or enterprise features like SAML support will still have to upgrade to a paid plan, but those now start at $4 per month and user for the Teams plans instead of the previous $9, with the Enterprise plan starting at $21 per month and user.


2018. GitHub business users now get access to public repos



GitHub, the code hosting service Microsoft recently acquired, is launching a couple of new features for its business users that will make it easier for them to access public repositories on the service. Traditionally, users on the hosted Business Cloud and self-hosted Enterprise were not able to directly access the millions of public open-source repositories on the service. Now, with the service’s release, that’s changing, and business users will be able to reach beyond their firewalls to engage and collaborate with the rest of the GitHub community directly. With this, GitHub now also offers its business and enterprise users a new unified search feature that lets them tap into their internal repos but also look at open-source ones.


2018. Microsoft acquired GitHub



Microsoft has acquired popular code sharing and collaboration service GitHub for $7.5B. From the smallest startups to giants like Microsoft, companies use the cloud-based service to work on code collaboratively. GitHub has 27 million software developers working on 80 million repositories of code. So it seems like a natural acquisition for the new Microsoft, which under CEO Satya Nadella has increased its focus on serving software developers via cloud services — whether they’re coding for Microsoft Windows or not. In the case of GitHub, it’s used for everything from websites to iPhone apps. Microsoft’s GitHub acquisition also mean we’ll start to see even closer integration between Microsoft’s developer tools and the service.


2016. GitHub gets project management tool



GitHub unveiled the "biggest update" of its Git-based code hosting service. With this update, GitHub is moving beyond code by adding some basic Kanban board-like project management features. GitHub always featured support for integrations with a number of project management tools, but now you will also be able to use this new built-in tool to move cards with pull requests, issues and notes between columns like “in-progress,” “done,” and “never going to happen” (or whatever else you want those columns to be called). Like Trello and similar tools, you’ll be able to drag and drop cards between columns as needed.


2016. Atlassian launches Bitbucket Pipelines



Atlassian unveiled Bitbucket Pipelines that offers a continuous delivery service that’s built right into the Atlassian-hosted Bitbucket Cloud service. Thanks to this, developers can easily automate their workflow of building and deploying their code every time they push an update to their Bitbucket repositories. During the beta, Bitbucket Pipeline will be available for free to all developers who want to give it a try. Other updates include the launch of Connect for JIRA Service Desk, which now allows third-party developer to build embeddable add-ons for that services, and the open-sourcing of RADAR, Atlassian’s internal tool for generating API documentation, which unsurprisingly follows the Open API Initiative’s specs.


2015. Atlassian merges Bitbucket and Stash developer services



Atlassian has long offered a number of Git-based developer services under the Bitbucket and Stash brands for developers who want either need a cloud-based or on-premises code management service. Now, however, the company is combining these brands under the Bitbucket name and launching a number of new features for its Git-based services. Atlassian is also announcing three major new features to Bitbucket. The first is Git Mirroring, which will make it easier and faster for distributed teams to use Git. The second is support for large files — something Git has long struggled with — and the third is support for projects, which will make it much easier to organize complex Git repositories. It’s worth noting, though, that Bitbucket now competes with the likes of GitHub Enterprise and other enterprise Git services. Even Microsoft, after all, now offers Git support in its Team Foundation Server products.


2015. Version control service GitHub raises $250M



GitHub, the software development collaboration and version control service based on the popular open source Git tool, has raised a $250 million funding round. The company plans to use this new round to accelerate growth and expand its sales and engineering team (as most companies do when they raise). There can be no doubt that Git has become something of a de facto version control system for many startups and GitHub currently leads the charge among companies that essentially offer Git as a service. Atlassian, Microsoft, GitLab and others offer similar services, both cloud-hosted and on premise, but GitHub has clearly attracted most of the mindshare in recent years. GitHub says it currently has about 10 million users who are in collaboration on over 25 million projects (that’s up from 10 million in January 2014). Given that the company offers free accounts, it’s not clear how many of these users are actually paying for the service, though (pricing starts at $5/month).


2015. Code management service Bitbucket opens to third-party extensions



Bitbucket, Atlassian’s GitHub-like code management service, is getting a major update this week that now allows third-party tools to integrate their applications right into the service. Atlassian claims that this new Connect for Bitbucket feature will help developers get all the information they need to ship their code in one place without having to constantly switch between tools that aren’t integrated with each other. The company argues that there is no other product in the market that allows this kind of integration right into the product’s user interface. Some of the launch partners for this feature include code analytics services like StiltSoft and bitHound, cloud IDEs like Codeanywhere and Codio, and Sourcegraph‘s code search tool. In total, there are currently about a dozen plug-ins available.


2014. GitHub Enterprise now works on Amazon Web Services



The new version of code repository software GitHub Enterprise 2.0 allows to take the service’s virtual machines and stand up a highly scalable version of GitHub‘s services on Amazon’s cloud computing platform Amazon Web Services. The update also includes a number of other features, no matter whether it’s hosted on AWS or not. Companies want to be able to use their existing single sign-on solution with GitHub, for example, and they can now use and LDAP or SAML compatible solution to do so. Also new are security audit logs, so admins can keep a better tab on users and allow them to audit account, team and repository access over time.


2014. ZenHub helps engineering teams manage projects inside GitHub



GitHub is now popular enough for other companies to start building services around it. One of the latest projects that aims to make working with GitHub faster and easier is ZenHub. With ZenHub, teams get a project management service that is deeply integrated with GitHub and provides them with Trello-like drag-and-drop task boards, easy uploads for any type of file (GitHub’s interface only allows image file uploads by default) and +1 buttons for providing quick feedback about commits, pull requests, suggestions and comments. The focus is mostly on developers, but the easy-to-use interface also allows business users to manage their workflows in GitHub, which could eliminate a company’s need for any other third-party management tool.