Amazon Web Services vs Skytap


30
Amazon Web Services
Access a reliable, on-demand infrastructure to power your applications, from hosted internal applications to SaaS offerings. Scale to meet your application demands, whether one server or a large cluster. Leverage scalable database solutions. Utilize cost-effective solutions for storing and retrieving any amount of data, any time, anywhere.
5
Skytap
Skytap provides Environments as a Service to the enterprise. Skytap Environments as a Service remove the biggest constraints slowing development teams down. Our solution removes the inefficiencies and constraints that companies have within the software development lifecycle.
Amazon Web Services vs Skytap in our news:


2019 - AWS launches fully-managed backup service for business



Amazon’s AWS cloud platform has added a new service Backup, that allows companies to back up their data from various AWS services and their on-premises apps. To back up on-premises data, businesses can use the AWS Storage Gateway. The service allows users to define their various backup policies and retention periods, including the ability to move backups to cold storage (for EFS data) or delete them completely after a certain time. By default, the data is stored in Amazon S3 buckets. Most of the supported services, except for EFS file systems, already feature the ability to create snapshots. Backup essentially automates that process and creates rules around it, so it’s no surprise that the pricing for Backup is the same as for using those snapshot features (with the exception of the file system backup, which will have a per-GB charge).

2017 - AWS launched browser-based IDE for cloud developers



Amazon Web Services launched a new browser-based IDE, AWS Cloud9. It isn’t all that different from similar IDEs and editors like Sublime Text, but as AWS stressed during today’s keynote, it allows for collaborative editing and it’s also deeply integrated into the AWS ecosystem. The tool comes with built-in support for languages like JavaScript, Python, PHP and others. Cloud9 also includes pre-installed debugging tools. AWS argues that this is the first “cloud native” IDE, though I’m sure some of its competitors will take issue with this description. Either way, though, Cloud9 is deeply integrated with AWS and developers can create cloud environments and start new instances right from the tool.

2017 - AWS introduced per-second billing for EC2 instances. Your move, Skytap !



Over the last few years, some alternative cloud platforms moved to more flexible billing models (mostly per-minute billing) and now AWS is one-upping many of them by moving to per-second billing for its Linux-based EC2 instances. This new per-second billing model will apply to on-demand, reserved and spot instances, as well as provisioned storage for EBS volumes. Amazon EMR and AWS Batch are also moving to this per-second model. it’s worth noting, though, that there is a one-minute minimum charge per instance and that this doesn’t apply to machines that run Windows or some of the Linux distributions that have their own separate hourly charges.

2017 - AWS offers a virtual machine with over 4TB of memory to challenge



Amazon’s AWS launched its largest EC2 machine (in terms of memory size) yet: the x1e.32xlarge instance with a whopping 4.19TB of RAM. Previously, EC2’s largest instance only featured just over 2TB of memory. These machines feature quad-socket Intel Xeon processors running at 2.3 GHz, up to 25 Gbps of network bandwidth and two 1,920GB SSDs. There are obviously only a few applications that need this kind of memory. It’s no surprise, then, that these instances are certified to run SAP’s HANA in-memory database and its various tools and that SAP will offer direct support for running these applications on these instances. It’s worth noting that Microsoft Azure’s largest memory-optimized machine currently tops out at just over 2TB and that Google already calls it quits at 416GB of RAM.

2017 - Skytap raises $45M for its enterprise cloud to keep up with Windows Azure



Alternative enterprise cloud provider Skytap has raised a $45 million Series E funding round led by Goldman Sachs Private Capital Investing, with participation from existing investors. This brings Skytap’s total funding to date to $109 million. Skytap is going up against all of the major cloud service providers like AWS, Azure and Google Cloud Platform, but Skytap CEO Thor Culverhouse argues that his competitors’ clouds were built for greenfield applications while Skytap was specifically built to serve Fortune 500 companies that want to slowly modernize their enterprise applications. The idea, of course, is for these enterprises to then stay on the Skytap cloud as they adopt new development paradigms like microservices and technologies like software containers. Thus Skytap remains more attractive for large enterprise than Windows Azure

2014 - Skytap gets $35M for its cloud development environment to take on Amazon Web Services



Skytap, the service that aims to help enterprise development and test teams work more efficiently (and test their code more often), announced that it has raised a $35 million funding round led by Insight Venture Partners. With Skytap, enterprises can re-create their production environments in the cloud to more effectively test their applications before they go live. The company says it will use the new funding to “fuel new levels of product innovation for enterprise-ready development and test environments,” and to expand its go-to-market capacity and bring more partners on board. Skytap was originally called Illumita and previously raised $29.5 million.

2014 - AWS now supports Docker containers to defeate Cloud Foundry



Amazon announced the preview availability of EC2 Container Services – the new service for managing Docker containers that boosts Amazon Web Services support for hybrid cloud. This bring the benefits of easy development management, portability between environments, lower risk in deployments, smoother maintenance and management of application components, and the ability for it all to work together. AWS isn’t the first cloud provider to offer Docker’s open source engine support. Google has extended its support for Docker containers with its new Google Container Engine powered by its own Kubernetes, announced just last week during the Google Cloud Platform Live event. And, back in August, Microsoft announced its support for Kubernetes in managing Docker containers in Azure.

2014 - Amazon and Microsoft drop cloud prices



Cloud computing is becoming cheaper and cheaper. So, if you once (for example, a year ago) calculated whether it was cost-effective to migrate your IT infrastructure to the cloud and decided that it was still expensive, then recalculate again. Since then, cloud platform reduced prices two or three times. Another round of happening now. Since tomorrow  Amazon S3 cloud storage pricing will decrease by 6-22 % (depending on the used space), and the cost of cloud server hard drives (Amazon EBS) will fall by 50%. And a month later Microsoft's cloud platform Windows Azure  will reduce its prices by 20% to keep them a little lower than Amazon's. So think once again, why buy an in-house server if the cost of the cloud tends to zero.

2012 - Google and Amazon reduce cloud storage prices. Launch new cloud services



Competition - is good for customers. On Monday, Google reduced prices for its Google Cloud Storage by over 20%, and today, in response, Amazon has reduced prices for its S3 storage by 25%. Obviously, in the near future, Microsoft will also reduce prices for Windows Azure, to bring them to the competitive level - about $0.09/month per GB. The same story occured in March when Amazon lowered prices, and then Microsoft and Google aligned their pricing with Amazon. Because on the cloud platforms market the price is no longer a competitive advantage, but your pricing is higher than the competition - is't a big disadvantage. Some experts already doubt that Amazon and the contenders are earning something on selling gigabytes and gigahertzs. Like in case with the mobile market, the main task of cloud vendors - is to hook up large companies and SaaS-providers to their platforms, even if they should sell computing resources at a loss.

All the talks about open cloud platforms, open cloud standards and free migration between clouds - most likely will remain just talks. OpenStack is trying to build the communism in the Cloud, but with its communist-like business organization, it will hardly succeed. Meanwhile, Amazon, Google, Microsoft are build cloud platforms with their own standards, with unique features, and can afford to reduce prices for computer resources. They can afford because customers will remain and pay for additional features. Migrating to another platform will be very difficult.

In addition to new pricing, Google and Amazon introduced the new cloud services. Google launched the clone of Amazon's Glacier - Durable Reduced Availability Storage (cheap storage for very large amounts of data with slow data access). And Amazon played its muscles. It's new service Redshift allow to host databases the size of which is measured in petabytes. It's difficult to say about the demand for such a service, but it should definitely make a positive impact on Amazon's reputation. If they can play with petabyte-databases, than your little project will work on Amazon without a hitch.

2012 - Amazon Glacier: Cloud storage service using Humanoid robots to stand out over Heroku



Humanoid robots - is just our assumption, but it's first idea, that comes to mind when looking at the new service Amazon Glacier. This is a solution for the long-term storage of archives and backups, which are needed for business very rare, or may be never used, but should be stored because of some state or corporate guidelines. The point is that storing data in Amazon Glacier is very cheap. Only 1 cent per month for 1 GB (10 times less than in the Amazon S3). But if you want to get any file - you need to order it first and wait 3-5 hours until it becomes available. (We think that during this time the robot can find the hard drive in the data center and bring it to the control panel). In addition, Amazon Glacier customers will be able to download only 5% of their data per month and will pay $0.12 per GB for data transfer exceeding 1 GB per month.