Google Cloud Platform vs Heroku


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Google Cloud Platform
Google Cloud Platform is a set of modular cloud-based services that allow you to create anything from simple websites to complex applications. Cloud Platform provides the building blocks so you can quickly develop everything from simple websites to complex applications. Explore how you can make Cloud Platform work for you.
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Heroku
Heroku is the leading platform as a service in the world and supports Ruby, Java, Python, Scala, Clojure, and Node.js. Deploying an app is simple and easy. No special tools needed, just a plain git push. Deployment is instant, whether your app is big or small.

Latest news about Google Cloud Platform and Heroku:



13.03.17. Google Cloud Platform improved its free tier. Google launched an improved always-free tier and trial program for its Cloud Platform. The free tier, which now offers enough power to run a small app in Google’s cloud, now allows for free usage of a small (f1-micro) instance in Compute Engine, Cloud Pub/Sub, Google Cloud Storage and Cloud Functions. In total, the free tier now includes 15 services. The addition of the Compute Engine instance and 5GB of free Cloud Storage usage is probably the most important update here because those are, after all, the services that are at the core of most cloud applications. You can find the exact limits here. With this move, Google is clearly stepping up its attacks against AWS, which offers a similar but more limited free tier program for its users.



02.02.17. Google Cloud Platform takes on Windows Azure with new Windows VMs. Google announced several new products today aimed at luring IT pros who are using Windows in their data centers to the Google Cloud Platform. The company introduced support for Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise and Windows Server Core on the Cloud Platform. In addition, the company announced support for SQL Server Always-On Availability Group for customers who are concerned about high availability and disaster recovery when running critical operations in a cloud setting. What this means in practical terms is that IT pros can now launch pre-configured virtual machines running any of these products on Google Cloud Platform, and pay for them by the minute — or they can bring an existing SQL Server license they have already paid for.



12.01.17. Google Cloud Platform gets a new key management service. Google Cloud Platform is launching a new key management service, that will help enterprises, especially in regulated industries like healthcare and banking, to create, use, rotate and destroy their encryption keys in the cloud. Enterprises have traditionally managed their keys on-premise, but as they have slowly moved more of their workloads to the cloud, they have also started thinking about how they can manage their keys in the cloud, too. With the AWS Key Management Service and Azure Key Vault, Amazon and Microsoft have long offered a similar tool, for example, and even Google itself already offered a more basic version of Cloud KMS for users who wanted to supply their own encryption keys.



24.10.16. Google Cloud Platform gets new a cold storage service. Google launched Coldline - a new cold storage service for data archiving and disaster recovery (an alternative to Amazon Glacier). Google Cloud Storage already offered the similar service Nearline. But when Nearline came out of beta earlier this year, it also became much faster. Instead of three to five seconds of latency, access to data was now real-time. So, Coldline basically fills the gap that the improved Nearline service left after it came out of beta. Coldline storage will only cost $0.007 per gigabyte per month (and $0.05 per gigabyte retrieved). Nearline costs $0.01 per month. That may not look like a huge difference, but those numbers quickly add up if you are storing massive amounts of data.



20.11.15. Google launched custom machine types for its Cloud Platform. Google Cloud Platform launched a new way of buying virtual machines in its cloud - Custom Machine Types. With new Custom Machine Types, Google lets you specify exactly how many vCPUs (up to 32) and how much memory you need (up to 6.5 GiB per vCPU — Google likes to be precise, so it doesn’t use ‘gigabyte’ and instead specifies the number of gibibytes). If your needs change — as they inevitably will — you can adjust the number of cores and memory as needed. Maybe you’ve outgrown the virtual machine with two vCPUs. Typically, you would have to step up to a machine type with four vCPUs, even if you only needed three. Because you don’t have a choice, you end up paying for more power than you need.



20.02.15. Heroku launches application development platform for Enterprise. Heroku, the Salesforce-owned, application development and hosting platform, announced a new product line called Heroku Enterprise. It’s geared for big companies that want to develop the kind of modern applications seen at startups while providing the type of features that many large enterprises want, including security features and access control. Essentially, the product line claims that large enterprises can now have it both ways: a way to make the type of applications that are typically derived from an agile-development process (with access to trendy technology like containers and new database services) all while being monitored under the iron fist of the enterprise. Kudos to Heroku if it can pull that off. With Heroku Enterprise, organizations can supposedly now monitor all their developers, applications and resources under one interface.



31.01.15. VMware will make Google Cloud Platform available to its customers. Google is teaming up with VMware to make select Google Cloud Platform services available to VMware customers via vCloud Air, VMware’s hybrid cloud platform. Google BigQuery analytics and Google Cloud Storage, as well as Google’s Datastore and DNS services, will be available via vCloud Air sometime later this year, with other Google services potentially coming later. Depending on execution, both companies can claim a win here. VMware gets four Google services, including the powerful BigQuery analytics, to woo enterprise customers. Google gets to put some of its best and brightest IP in front of the enterprise cloud users it craves. Google needs a better hybrid cloud picture and VMware needs to prove its cloud can play with the big boys (or boy, meaning Amazon Web Services).



24.01.15. Google Cloud Platform now allows to store Docker container images. Google announced the beta launch of the Google Container Registry for its Cloud Platform. This new service allows developers to host, share and manage their private Docker container repositories on the company’s cloud computing platform. By default, Docker offers its own public images registry so developers can quickly install anything from a basic unadorned Ubuntu machine to servers that have already been set up to run WordPress, mongoDB, Hadoop or virtually any other server package you can think of. Many businesses have no interest in publishing their containers to a public repository, of course. They can run their own private repositories or use services like Quay.io that offer this feature as a cloud-based service. At its core, that’s what Google’s Container Registry does, too, but with a focus on Google’s own cloud computing platform.



12.12.14. Google Cloud Platform now supports server-side software for Windows. Google introduced Microsoft License Mobility for Google Cloud Platform that means Google’s customers can move their existing Microsoft server application software licenses (SQL Server, SharePoint, Exchange Server, and so on) from on-premises to Google Cloud Platform without any additional Microsoft software licensing fees. This makes the transition to Google’s cloud easier, and it also lets customers who prefer to purchase perpetual licenses to continue to do so. Besides Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter Edition is now available to all Google Cloud Platform customers in beta on Google Compute Engine. This option can be interesting for enterprises that want to mitigate risk in the cloud, and move some of their workloads from Azure to an alternate platform – in this case, Google cloud.



05.11.14. Google Cloud Platform slashes prices, adds containers, VPN support. During its Cloud Platform conference Google announced new products for its Google Cloud Platform. The first - service called Google Container Engine that lets businesses move from managing application components running on individual virtual machines to portable Docker containers that are scheduled into a managed compute cluster for you. Another addition is App Engine with auto-scaling support, Cloud SDK integration and support for runtimes built on Docker containers. Other rollouts include carrier interconnect with partners like Verizon and VPN support, starting in early 2015. This will let users keep apps and data in-house and using the public cloud for other tasks.  Google also slashed the prices for its Cloud Platform that should make both large and small-scale business partners happy. In addition to a 10% drop in pricing last month, here's a look at the latest cuts: BigQuery Storage falls almost 25%; PD Snapshots is down about 80%. Meanwhile, Disk SSD storage is cut nearly in half; and the price of large Cloud SQL instances dropped 25%.



23.05.14. Salesforce connects Heroku to its cloud. Salesforce finally connected the Heroku cloud application platform (which it acquired in 2010) to Force.com with the release of the Heroku Connect tool. Heroku and Force.com represent two vastly different development systems based on completely different programming languages—but Salesforce now has a working bi-directional connection between them. Instead of a deep integration with Heroku, Salesforce customers can connect Heroku apps to Salesforce without the need for extensive recoding, which is a potentially expensive and time-consuming affair. Salesforce knows it needs to show off tools like Heroku Connect to attract developers and convince them Force.com will work with popular Web toolkits like Node.js, Ruby on Rails and Java.



2012. Top 7 Dreamforce stories. At the Dreamforce 12 conference Salesforce presented a lot of new products, but the problem is that most of these new products either had been already presented at the conference last year, or will become live to next year's conference. So, we'll just briefly go over the main ones:1. Salesforce Marketing Cloud has absorbed the acquired services Radian6 and Buddy Media and become the most powerful social marketing tool in the world.2. Service for employee development and business goals achievement Work.com is already live and appeared in the top six Salesforce's products on the home page of the company site


2010. Force.com 2 - already 5 PaaS platfroms. At the Dreamforce conference, Salesforce demonstrated one more time that now it's not so interested in CRM (it was mainly a subject for jokes) as in cloud platforms. Following the release of SaaS database Database.com, the company introduced another big Force.com feature - Heroku - the PaaS startup that Salesforce has recently acquired for $ 212 million. Heroku - is a cloud platform for developing and hosting Ruby-applications (Ruby - is a popular framework for developing Web apps, created by 37Signals). Heroku became one of the five PaaS-services included in the new version Force.com 2. And the new structure of the Force.com platform now looks like this: