DropBox vs OneDrive


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DropBox
Dropbox is a Web-based file hosting service that uses cloud computing to enable users to store and share files and folders with others across the Internet using file synchronization. There are both free and paid services, each with varying options. In comparison to similar services, Dropbox offers a relatively large number of user clients across a variety of desktop and mobile operating systems. DropBox alternatives for enterprise are: Box, Microsoft SharePoint, Office 365.
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OneDrive
Tools for online file/docs storage and collaboration. Contains Web versions of Microsoft office editors (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote). Excel web version allows simultaneous document editing in real time. OneDrive alternatives for enterprise are: Box, Office 365, Sharepoint.

Latest news about DropBox and OneDrive:



14.06.17. Dropbox updated admin panel for Business users. Dropbox is adding more features to its admin dashboard, which is part of its larger AdminX initiative. With the new AdminX, Dropbox hopes to provide a better user experience to the admins who provision accounts and set controls over who can access what. The first thing the company did was to redesign the admin console to make it simpler to use. To improve security, Dropbox is also enabling admins to manage the amount of time employees can stay logged in and access files with new web session control features. It’s also allowing admins to specify certain teams with subdomain verification. By linking certain accounts or users to a subdomain, admins can better control who can access an enterprise’s Dropbox account.



02.02.17. Dropbox launched collaboration app Paper globally in 21 languages. Dropbox is rolling out its note-collaboration app Paper globally localized into 21 languages. It also gets some new tools that allow users to automatically generate presentations and run them through Paper in their browsers.  Paper came out in a closed beta in the second quarter last year, and then opened as a public beta in the third quarter. As it’s inched closer to launch, both Google and Salesforce in some ways have thrown their weight behind collaborative tools in a similar vein to Paper. Salesforce bought Quip for $750 million late last year. While Paper was already competing with Quip in some ways, Salesforce’s major acquisition of the company signaled that it was quickly looking to broaden its enterprise toolkit. That means that Dropbox will likely come more into direct competition in this space with Salesforce, which may be able to throw more resources at the problem than Dropbox can. For Dropbox, the hope is that its strategy of religiously tracking user behavior will be part of the edge that keeps them ahead of those larger companies.



12.10.16. Dropbox adds PDF signing, iMessage integrations. Dropbox is updating its iOS app with few new features that should help it continue to have a toehold within larger companies. The first update is PDF signing, which allows users to open PDF files right from their mobile devices and insert signatures and text into them. Another update Dropbox is getting today is an integration with iMessage - rich file-sharing within iMessage that includes previews and the like for its users. Besides, the new lock-screen widget will give users the ability to do the most common actions you might find in a Dropbox app from the lock screen. Tapping on one of the functions will go straight to an operation within Dropbox.



28.07.16. Dropbox adds a new dashboard for IT admins. Cloud storage service Dropbox unveiled AdminX, a new dashboard aimed at IT admins to better tailor and control their companies’ files and users on Dropbox Business accounts. Dropbox says that AdminX has been an internal initiative for a year already: and the premise is simple. While there have been admin tools on Dropbox Business ever since the product was launched, these have not seen much use. So taking a page from its own consumerization book, Dropbox has reimagined them with more intuition and simpler interfaces. At the same time, the company is preparing to launch yet more services that take it beyond basic storage: soon it plans to launch mobile device management as part of the AdminX console so that admins can use Dropbox to control not just Dropbox-based files but actual devices.



22.06.16. Dropbox launched a new way to scan documents with your phone. Dropbox released a slew of new enterprise features. The most interesting new feature is a tool in its mobile application that allows business users to scan documents and upload them directly into Dropbox. The idea is that there is still a lot of activity and business development that happens in the real world, and Dropbox hopes to seamlessly extend that into its services. Here’s one of the more unique aspects: the company uses optical character recognition (or OCR, for short) to recognize text on the document that it’s scanning. That makes content within those documents — if it works — actually searchable inside the app. Given that Dropbox’s strength has generally been its core technology, and its quick synchronization tools, the company is clearly leaning on that in order to build a differentiated product.



03.05.16. Dropbox will allow users to access cloud-only folders from Windows and Mac. Dropbox announced Project Infinite that is going to make managing your local computer storage and cloud storage quite a bit easier. The idea is to allow you to access your files on Dropbox right in Finder or Explorer instead of needing to navigate Dropbox's online interface. In other words, the files look like they're in your computer but actually aren't, allowing you to easily find and manage Dropbox-only files. There is no information about when this update will be coming to Dropbox or whether it will only be available to paid pro users or business users.



09.12.15. Dropbox is shutting down its email app Mailbox. Dropbox will shut down its popular email app Mailbox on Feb. 26, 2016. The reason for closing was vague. Dropbox CEO Drew Houston and CTO Arash Ferdowsi called the decision the result of "tough choices" in a blog post announcing the news. "Over the past few months, we’ve increased our team’s focus on collaboration and simplifying the way people work together. In light of that, we’ve made the difficult decision to shut down Carousel and Mailbox." The company says it will be "using what we've learned from Mailbox to build new ways to communicate and collaborate," pointing to its note-taking app Paper, which rolled out in beta earlier this year. Mailbox was already hugely popular when Dropbox acquired it in 2013, but had been struggling to deal will the massive influx of users. It really took off after the startup was finally able to do away with its waitlist — which at one point was hundreds of thousands of users long.



25.11.15. Dropbox allows to edit PDF files on the go. Dropbox users are now able to edit, annotate or comment their PDF files stored in Dropbox, or even electronically sign a PDF using the Acrobat Reader app,  while using iOS applications. Support for Android is set to arrive in the near future. This improved support for working with the popular file format comes on the heels of Dropbox’s partnership with Adobe, announced last month, which included Dropbox’s integration into Adobe’s Document Cloud, among other things. Before today, Adobe and Dropbox had already rolled out support for working with PDFs from the Adobe app on the desktop. That is, in addition to opening and viewing files, any edits you made to your files would automatically be saved to your Dropbox when complete.



22.09.15. Dropbox to offer collaboration features to free users. Dropbox  is launching a new feature called Dropbox Teams, which makes it easier for people to use their personal accounts at work. The feature will be available to Basic and Pro users over the next week. Here's how it works: Users can create a team folder to keep files in one place. Group members added to the team folder will have access to all the files within that folder. Anyone added to that team will have immediate access to everything, even if they're added later on. There's also an option to link your personal and work Dropbox accounts so that you can switch from one to the other without signing out. The new feature is aimed at smaller companies that may already use Dropbox but don't pay for Dropbox for Business, which offers more advanced features like more administrative and security controls such as two-factor authentication.



23.07.15. Dropbox acquired enterprise communication service Clementine. Dropbox has acquired Clementine, an enterprise communication service. Clementine focuses on internal communication, such as conference calls and chat services that aren’t connected to a personal phone number. It’s an important area for the workplace, given that more and more people are connecting their work software to personal devices.  Dropbox is now beefing up its enterprise services to launch a suite of products that help businesses collaborate on files like documents. Recently it launched a tool that lets Dropbox users request files from people who aren’t using Dropbox. Clementine’s services will be shutting down as part of the acquisition, according to the company.



02.02.15. Microsoft gives Apple Users OneDrive For Business Access. Microsoft has released the first public version of OneDrive for Business for Mac. With the new OneDrive for Business for Mac, users will be able to do the same as well as access and use files in their OneDrive through the Mac Finder and manage and sync files in the same way they would with the existing application for Windows. The OneDrive for Business client for Mac also allows users to access and take their OneDrive for Business files offline so users can access downloaded files without having to have access to an Internet connection. However, the real draw is that the iOS app for mobile devices lets users access both their OneDrive for Business and OneDrive consumer accounts from the same app.



23.01.15. Dropbox for Windows Phone is now available. Right after Microsoft previewed Windows 10 for computers, tablets and phones, Dropbox launches an app for Windows Phone. The free app offers 2GB of Dropbox storage for new users and can automatically back up all of files on your device, just as it can for Apple iOS and Google Android. You can mark files or folders as favorites while offline and later view them when back online. You can share files or folders with a link, backup photos automatically right after snapping them, and favorite files for offline access. And if you have Dropbox accounts for both personal and business use, you can manage them separately within the app.



21.01.15. Dropbox buys mobile office app CloudOn. Dropbox acquired Israel-based mobile productivity startup CloudOn. CloudOn claims to have nine million registered users of its service, which allows users to edit, create and share files from Microsoft Office and others online. CloudOn has ceased allowing new user sign-ups today, and it confirmed that its products will shut for good on March 2015 as its 30-person team transitions to working for Dropbox. “We’re thrilled to continue building things that help people work better — and we’re proud and excited to join the Dropbox team to help people be more productive every day,” CloudOn’s executive team wrote.



05.11.14. Microsoft Office integrates with Dropbox. Microsoft and Dropbox announced a partnership that will see Dropbox better support Microsoft’s Office suite. The deal has four main parts: Quickly editing Office docs from the Dropbox mobile app; accessing Dropbox docs from Office apps; sharing Dropbox links of Office apps; and the creation of first-party Dropbox apps for Microsoft’s mobile offerings. No you can add your Dropbox account to Microsoft Word, Excel or PowerPoint mobile apps, navigate folders and files on Dropbox to view and edit in the native Office apps. In return, Dropbox will encourage its users to turn to Microsoft Office applications to edit and create their documents in the first place. Microsoft has another alliance with Box to ease co-existence of Office 365 and Box cloud storage and file sync software.



28.10.14. Office 365 gets unlimited OneDrive storage.. As of today, Office 365 Home, Personal and University customers are getting the storage boost. Business customers will get unlimited storage will get unlimited storage also soon. In the meantime, they have 1 TB of storage per user. OneDrive works much like Google Drive, allowing you to access content on all of your devices, plus share it and collaborate on documents. Google Drive, Box, Dropbox and other cloud-storage utilities, though, have limited storage capabilities. If you meet a limit, you have to buy more. Bitcasa, one of the few platforms to offer unlimited storage, actually ceased that operation last week, giving Microsoft a big advantage in regards to storage.



30.08.14. OneDrive unifies access to business and personal files. Microsoft's Onedrive is making it easier for mobile users to access both business and personal files simultaneously (from both personal and work accounts). The app will distinguish which account each file belongs to in order to avoid potential mixups, but users can view and back up files to both accounts. Microsoft will also add an extra layer of security to the app with the ability to set a four-digit PIN that can be required to restrict access to individual files or the entire app. Next week these new features will appear in the Android app and in the coming months the updates will roll out to the iOS and Windows Phone apps.



28.08.14. Dropbox gives paid subscribers 1TB of cloud storage. At last Dropbox joins the cloud-storage Price War that's already almost over (Google Drive and Box already offer unlimited storage). From now Dropbox provides 1 terabyte of storage for $9.99 a month. Besides the new storage qoutes, the service added new features enabling users to add passwords for shared links and set expiration dates that will take shared files down after a certain amount of time. Users will also be able to set view-only permissions to shared folders to ensure that their files aren’t messed with by people they’re shared with. Another feature that is now available to Pro users is the ability to remotely wipe files from your Dropbox folder if your laptop happens to get lost or stolen. With new pricing and updates to its Pro offering, Dropbox is hoping to show that it can compete on price while also providing greater value to paying users through a number of new features they probably won’t find on other services.



21.08.14. Mailbox gets a native Mac client. Popular email app Mailbox (owned by Dropbox) launches native client for Mac Desktop. Like Mailbox's mobile apps, the desktop version takes advantage of the platform's auto-swipe functionality, which learns from users' patterns to predict what they may do with individual emails. Preferences are synced with users' Dropbox accounts so the settings are preserved across devices and accounts linked to Mailbox. Another big change to the app is the addition of drafts to the iOS and desktop version. A draft is almost like a collaborative doc in your Dropbox — it's not taking up space and it's not like you can access it — but Dropbox is holding that metadata so your drafts aren't replicated a thousand times.



24.06.14. Microsoft OneDrive gives 15 Gb for free. Microsoft increased the free limit of cloud storage in OneDrive to 15 Gb (previously was 7Gb). If you want more storage capacity, you can now pay $1.99 monthly for 100 gigabytes. The company will also now offer free 1Tb to all Office 365 customers. For example, Office 365 Personal costs $6.99 monthly and now it comes with almost unlimited storage. If compare this to competitors: Google Drive provides 25 Gb free and offers almost similar pricing, charging $1.99 a month for 100GB and $9.99 for 1TB. Apple grants 5GB free, charging $0.99 a month for 20GB. There is no 100GB option, but at 200GB, the rate is the same as OneDrive's, at $3.99. Amazon Cloud Drive gives 5 GB Free and offers 100 Gb for $4.1 per month. So OneDrive's price cut is not a big problem for giants, but further puts the pressure on third-party services such as Dropbox and Box.



14.04.14. Mailbox - email app from Dropbox. Dropbox is still the most popular cloud file storage and sharing service in spite of competition from IT giants like Google and Microsoft. What's its secret? Perhaps its main advantage - is usability. So, a year ago, Dropbox developers thought: "If we can win the storage-market with our usability, why not try to conquer the email-market?". And they acquired (for $ 100 million) the startup Mailbox, which had just the same goal. First, it worked only on iPhone (and was very popular) and recently Dropbox launched versions for Android and Mac. What's so wonderful about this application? First, it's "mobile-first". It was created with phones and tablets in mind. So many people find Mailbox touch-interface much more comfortable than Gmail or iPhone Mail. Second, the main goal of this app is fighting for the empty inbox. Mailbox lets you put off messages until later and returns them to your inbox automatically, so you can focus on what's important now. Thus, every time you check your mail - you keep your inbox empty, and your memory - clear.