Asana vs Slack


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Asana
Asana is the shared task list for your team, where you can plan, organize & stay in sync on everything.As fast as a text editor. Plenty of keyboard shortcuts, fewer page loads and mouse clicks. Asana is one app that won't get in your way.
35
Slack
Slack brings all your communication together in one place. It's real-time messaging, archiving and search for modern teams. Create open channels for the projects, groups and topics that the whole team shares. Slack searches whole conversations, not just individual messages, so you can find what you’re looking for no matter who said what or when they said it.

Latest news about Asana and Slack:



18.05.17. Slack adds screen sharing. Slack now lets paid users to share live video of their screens during video calls. The feature will roll out on Slack’s latest Mac and Windows apps over the next few days. To use Slack screensharing, fire up a video call then hit the screenshare button. You can select your preferred screen if you’re using several, your webcam will deactivate, and Slack notifications won’t appear to avoid exposing any private info. Viewers will see all of your shared screen including your cursor so you can easily point things out. Slack’s native screensharing feature will compete with several integrations with third-party products it already offered, including Skype, BlueJeans, Appear.in, Google Hangouts, and Zoom.



01.02.17. Slack launched Enterprise version of its group chat. Slack has launched Enterprise Grid — a new product aimed at large enterprises. It comes with a range of features that are essentially table stakes in the enterprise software market. IT administrators are now be able to manage and provision multiple large teams; and, in addition to the encryption that Slack already offers, add in new layers of security and identity management; set new security and compliance controls; and new HIPAA & FINRA compliance and data loss prevention integration. The initial customers include Capital One, Paypal and IBM. IBM is a particularly interesting name to see here, given that it sells its own collaboration product for large enterprises, IBM Connections, and it is also working on what appears to be its own AI business intelligence product, Watson Workspace. Other would be competitors include Workplace from Facebook, Microsoft’s Teams, Jive and Spark from Cisco. Pricing for Enterprise Grid — unlike normal Slack, where pricing starts at $8 and $15 per month for two tiers.



20.01.17. Slack now allows to add comments to particular message. Workplace communications tool Slack has introduced threaded comments. With threads, users can pop out of the chaos of an ongoing chat and pin bits of conversations off to the side that they can address on a more regular basis. Users can jump in and out of their existing threads much like they do channels and direct messages, and when they want to share new comments back into a chat stream, they can do so by hitting a small checkbox at the bottom of their new message. The threads are located in the panel that pops out on the right side of your screen that has additional tools and resources for your existing rooms and direct messages. Starting a thread is as simple as clicking on a button next to a message in a room, much like you would add a reaction, and then it peels off into a new conversation within the right panel.



14.12.16. Slack adds video calls. Collaboration messenger Slack is adding one more key feature - video calling. Group video calls, for those on paid tiers, can handle up to 15 people currently, Slack says. The new feature will be available first on Slack for Mac and Windows on desktop and Google Chrome in the next few days. Those on mobile will be able to join video calls but will experience them as audio only. Video calls in Slack will have an interesting add-on - emojis. A lot of people who use video and audio conferencing for calls with work colleagues will turn on the mute button so that their random coughs and sighs or other ambient noise will not interrupt the soliloquies of their coworkers. Now if they want to make quick responses to things they won’t have to fumble around for the unmute button: instead they can offer a thumbs up, or whatever is right for the moment.



12.12.16. Google and Slack team up against Microsoft and Facebook. Recently Microsoft and Facebook launched their alternatives of the popular collaboration service Slack (Teams and Workplace respectively). Of course for Slack it's a tough competition, so they found a partner in face of Google. The companies signed the strategic partner agreement and soon will tightly integrate their product. In particular, Slack will become available as an app in G Suite (formerly Google Apps), so admins will be able to turn it on/off for their users. And inside Slack you'll be able to preview documents via Google Docs editors, and sync access rights for files attached from Google Drive. Besides, Slack will get integration with the new service Google Team Drives (it's the recently launched team-focused version of Google Drive).



27.10.16. Slack to be powered by IBM Watson AI. IBM and Slack today announced a partnership that combines Slack’s digital workplace with he cognitive computing capabilities of Watson. The goal is to use Watson's artificial intelligence (AI) learning engine to power offerings such as bots and other conversational inferences to improve the Slack user experience. Developers can use this enhanced cognitive functionality to tap a wide range of Watson services, such as Conversation, Sentiment Analysis and speech APIs, and build new tools for the platform.



27.09.16. Slack deeply integrates with Salesforce. Enterprise chat app Slack is adding a "deep product partnership" with Salesforce - an integration that will make it much easier for businesses to share data across the two platforms, specifically around employee conversations and sales account information. The Salesforce integration will work essentially like many of those other Slack integraions - with a backslash and keyword “Salesforce” to bring data into the conversation. This partnership can also mean that Salesforce would like to acquite the collaboration service. The company had big ambitions for its own messaging app, Chatter, but it hasn't become very popular so far. Recall that according to rumors Microsoft is also interested in acquiring Slack.



16.09.16. Asana adds Custom fields. Task management app Asana  is introducing a new product called custom fields, that will let you tailor Asana’s information management to cover a variety of structured data points. As Asana describes it, a company that, for example, might have been conducting a recruiting drive can now use Asana to create a form to track more details about actual candidates; a marketing team can now drill down into a larger plan to track specific campaigns; engineering teams can use it to record and monitor bug tracking; and design teams can use it to provide more detailed looks and updates about larger projects. The company also will be integrating custom fields into its API.  It means that you could, theoretically, come up with new applications of it that expose Asana even as a customer-facing tool to instantly gather and start structuring information.



16.05.16. Slack launched "Sign in with Slack" feature. Slack unveiled a new feature called “Sign in with Slack”, which will let Slack users sign into and use other apps using their Slack identities. So, it will compete with Facebook and Google that share this market. “Sign in with Slack” could turn Slack into the identity provider for the enterprise. Rather than having to remember a login and password for every different workplace app, you’ll be able to just use your Slack login. The move takes advantage of the fact that everybody in a company needs chat. While other workplace apps might only be necessary for certain departments, messaging is the thread that ties a business together. The launch-partners, supporting Slack-identity include the cloud-based word processing and collaboration app Quip, Figma, Kifi, Officevibe, Smooz and Slackline.



20.04.16. Threaded messaging is coming to Slack. Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield announced that threaded messaging — perhaps one of the service’s most important missing components — is finally coming in the next quarter. Slack had been using threading internally for months while testing what the best version of the tool would be for the service.  Adding threaded messaging, an important component in other services like Yammer, Citrix’s Podio and Convo, would level the playing field between collaboration services — and give Slack an opportunity to gobble up a much wider part of the field. Slack, as-is, is more like a tool for quickly building work-centric chat rooms with direct messaging integrated into it. Threaded comments would bring the service to another level, helping it become a more important part of the workflow and upending existing services.



31.03.16. Project management app Asana raised $50M. Asana, the app that lets teams track projects at a $600M valuation led by YC’s Sam Altman. Asana today has 13,000 paying businesses as customers and over 140,000 businesses using the product overall adding some 10,000 every month. The company has both free and premium tiers, with the latter charged at $8.33 per member per month for groups above 15, and for more features. As more businesses move their work processes online, the productivity apps are having a moment right now. Just last week, BetterWorks — another platform that helps workers set and manage tasks and goals — announced a Series B of $20 million. In addition to BetterWorks and Asana itself, there are others like Basecamp, Wrike and Trello all offering ways to boost productivity and help organize so-called knowledge workers.



20.01.16. Skype integrated with Slack. The new Slack integration allows team members using Slack’s real-time communication software a way to quickly start Skype voice or video call from within the Slack application. Once installed, kicking off a Skype call is as simple as just typing in “/skype” into the Slack chat interface, which will then display a join link. On the desktop, you’ll only need a web browser plugin, while on mobile, you’ll need to download the Skype mobile application onto your smartphone. Slack team members can also join as guests on a computer, or they can sign in using their Skype name or Microsoft account information.



17.12.15. Slack launched App Directory and will be funding developers. Enterprise collaboration service Slack wants developers to build Slack apps beyond the 150 like Dropbox and Twilio that it’s now showing off in its new App Directory. Moreover Slack announced it’s teamed up with its investors, who happen to be the Bay Area A-list of VCs —  Accel, Andreessen Horowitz, Index Ventures, KPCB, Spark, and Social+Capital. Together they’ve thrown in $80 million for a Slack-first fund. It will back enterprise software developers making Slack integrations part of their core product. Slack and its VCs want these developers to make Slack more useful and convenient with apps for doing all sorts of things in the workplace. The $80 million basically guarantees there will continue to be a healthy Slack platform. Competitors who copy its core messaging features can’t copy the developer ecosystem. That could give Slack an edge on HipChat and other competitors.



03.11.15. Enterprise messaging service Slack introduced User Groups. Slack is looking to enhance the experience of how larger organizations function through the introduction of User Groups. The new feature allows notifications to be specifically sent to separate departments. Whether it’s getting the message out to a company’s engineers, customer service teams or marketing teams, user groups allows entire groups to be alerted about issues in a moments notice. Initiatives like this fit into Slack’s larger focus of allowing the platform to operate more effectively for larger organizations. In turn, this feature will only be enabled for Slack teams on paid plans.



03.10.15. Task management startup Asana is launching a major revamp. Collaboration service Asana announced redesign, and several new features that, presumably, it expects to bolster its current in-market performance. The new version includes new features designed to bring communication inside of its own platform (hello, Slack), and a tool built to assist users in keeping tabs on information inside of their current work environments. There’s a new Asana Conversations feature to keep in touch with employees, too. You can create tasks inside of the new Conversations section. Another new feature will provide spreadsheet-like functionality, with easy filtering and dashboards. And from there Asana can notify those who are involved with a task. Currently in beta, this feature, called Track Anything, will ship in early 2016.



24.08.15. Now you can bring email into your Slack channels. Email remains ubiquitous and is quite useful for getting updates from pretty much every service on the Internet. That's why Slack is launching a new feature: all teams on the Standard or Plus plans can have email directed into Slack channels. If you don’t set this integration up correctly, your channels could turn into a clogged up shithole, so be sure to think about what emails you want to bring in and where you want them to be posted. Getting support tickets dropped right into a support channel means that your company can move into action faster. While you most certainly can’t reply to the email from within Slack, the alert alone is extremely valuable. What Slack is helping to kill is internal email, which is the bane of everyone’s existence at work.



24.07.15. Slack integrated with Google Calendar. Slack, the popular office communication tool, will now integrate with Google Calendar, letting events automatically post reminders inside slack channels. After linking a Google account to Slack, you can choose any calendar and instruct it to post to certain Slack channels. For example, you could have events from your company’s development deadline calendar post reminders to the #dev channel two days before a product deadline. Or, on a more lighthearted note, you could have your company’s birthday or holiday calendar automatically post to #general so your whole team can celebrate together. The integration will also allow daily or weekly calendar summaries to be sent out to everyone subscribed to a certain Slack channel.



20.03.15. Collaboration chat Slack gets a native Windows app. Popular group collaboration messenger Slack has finally released a Windows app. In case you’re unfamiliar, Slack is perhaps best described in an overly simple way: It’s a private chatroom for teams. Think Hipchat, but prettier and with the ability to integrate anything from Dropbox to Giphy with just a click. Windows app makes jumping in and out of Slack easier. It lets you run Slack in its own window, give it a home in your start menu, and gives you something to alt-tab to that isn’t one of the many browser tabs you might have open. It also means you get chat notifications that are more tightly integrated into the OS, the ability to jump between multiple Slack teams in one window (as opposed to a separate tab for each team), and neat tricks like the ability to tuck Slack into the task tray until you actually need it. Plus, it just feels a whole lot nicer.



31.01.15. Slack aquiered screen-sharing tool Screenhero. Slack, the workplace communication service, acquired Screenhero, a screen-sharing tool for teams, with plans to incorporate its features. Screenhero provides a range of collaboration tools, including voice chat, faster screen sharing between individuals and the option to have multiple mouse cursors interacting over various applications. The startup's six-person team will join Slack, and work to integrate and advance those features there. The Screenhero acquisition is Slack's second to date. It bought Spaces, a small startup also developing collaboration tools, in September.



20.01.15. Slack launches a new plan for larger companies. Collaboration chat app Slack launched some new features that target teams needing help with single sign-on, compliance exports, a 99.99 percent uptime guarantee and 24/7 premium support. It's called a Plus plan, a new option priced at $12.50 per user per month. The companies that will benefit from the Plus plan have specific team management, security and/or compliance requirements, according to Slack officials. These are often larger organizations, they said. Before today there were two options with Slack: Lite, which was free and had some restrictions, and Standard.