Amazon Web Services vs Google App Engine


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Amazon Web Services
Access a reliable, on-demand infrastructure to power your applications, from hosted internal applications to SaaS offerings. Scale to meet your application demands, whether one server or a large cluster. Leverage scalable database solutions. Utilize cost-effective solutions for storing and retrieving any amount of data, any time, anywhere.
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Google App Engine
Google App Engine lets you run web applications on Google's infrastructure. App Engine applications are easy to build, easy to maintain, and easy to scale as your traffic and data storage needs grow. With App Engine, there are no servers to maintain: You just upload your application, and it's ready to serve your users.

Latest news about Amazon Web Services and Google App Engine:



14.03.17. Google App Engine now supports all programming languages. Google launched the new version of its platform-as-a-service for building application backends App Engine.The big news is that App Engine now supports any programming language, so a developer can create the app in whatever language they are comfortable using. Google sees this as a game changer, making the platform more open, which is a big theme with the company as it transitions to try and lure enterprise customers to Google Cloud Platform in general. In the previous version there was a limited set of runtime libraries and once you built an application, it was very difficult to take it out of Google. The company has indicated that part of its philosophy on being open means making it easy to move and avoid lock-in, even if that means leaving Google Cloud Platform.



15.11.14. AWS now supports Docker containers. Amazon announced the preview availability of EC2 Container Services – the new service for managing Docker containers that boosts Amazon Web Services support for hybrid cloud. This bring the benefits of easy development management, portability between environments, lower risk in deployments, smoother maintenance and management of application components, and the ability for it all to work together. AWS isn’t the first cloud provider to offer Docker’s open source engine support. Google has extended its support for Docker containers with its new Google Container Engine powered by its own Kubernetes, announced just last week during the Google Cloud Platform Live event. And, back in August, Microsoft announced its support for Kubernetes in managing Docker containers in Azure.



07.04.14. Don't like cloud pricing? Wait a minute. According to the latest news, you need to wait just around 5 days before prices of cloud computing services will substantially drop. On March 26 Google announced price cut for Google Compute Engine (by 32%)  and Google App Engine (by 30%). And the cost of Google's cloud storage was reduced by as much as 68% (up to $0,026 per month per 1 GB). In 24 hours, Amazon responded - reduced the price of EC2 virtual machines by 30-40%, and the cost of S3 data storage - by 60% (down to $0,024 per gigabyte). Microsoft was very busy in recent days, so it reacted only after 5 days. Microsoft cut Windows Azure prices so that they were either identical or slightly lower than Amazon's. These three providers (Amazon, Microsoft and Google) reduce the cloud pricing so often that other players (IBM, Oracle, Rackspace, HP) simply can't take part in this cloud arms race, and the open cloud platform OpenStack also can't get the considerable market share.



31.01.14. Amazon and Microsoft drop cloud prices. Cloud computing is becoming cheaper and cheaper. So, if you once (for example, a year ago) calculated whether it was cost-effective to migrate your IT infrastructure to the cloud and decided that it was still expensive, then recalculate again. Since then, cloud platform reduced prices two or three times. Another round of happening now. Since tomorrow  Amazon S3 cloud storage pricing will decrease by 6-22 % (depending on the used space), and the cost of cloud server hard drives (Amazon EBS) will fall by 50%. And a month later Microsoft's cloud platform Windows Azure  will reduce its prices by 20% to keep them a little lower than Amazon's. So think once again, why buy an in-house server if the cost of the cloud tends to zero.



2013. Now you can use Google App Engine to host your company website. Google App Engine added support for PHP - the language on which 90% of websites are created. So now you can move your corporate website to this cloud platform. Why is it better than the regular hosting that you currently use? First, GAE provides free quotas: 1GB for file and data storage and 1Gb of traffic per day. So for most small business websites this hosting will be free. For large companies that have websites with big attendance - the cost would be almost the same as with regular hosting. But with GAE they can be sure that their sites work reliably, because GAE - is the platform on which Google's own services work and it can withstand heavy loads and even natural disasters. In addition to website hosting, the PHP support on Google App Engine may help to grow more SaaS services. Because now the large army of PHP-developers will get the opportunity to start for free and attract customers with the reliable platform.



2013. Google Compute Engine is available for all. Google launched its cloud IaaS platform Google Compute Engine a year ago, and then we called it the very strong competitor for Amazon Web Services. But the problem was that during this year the platform was available only for selected users (who paid $400/month for Google's Gold-support). Yesterday Google Compute Engine has become available to everyone, so let's get ready to rumble. With the public launch Google has added several new features. In particular, advanced routing - to create gateways and VPN servers, and enable you to build applications that span your local network and Google’s cloud, support for PHP in Google App Engine. Unlike AWS, Google introduced per-minute billing for the virtual servers (instead of per-hour). The pricing starts at $0.02/hour for a shared-core server. The video shows how you can create linux-server with the required parameters in 30 seconds on Google Compute Engine.



2012. Top 5 Enterprise 2.0 stories of 2012. What are the most memorable trends on the Enterprise market in 2012? Have our 2011 forecasts come true? Here are the top 5 most important (in our opinion) Enterprise 2.0 events and trends of 2012:



2012. Google and Amazon reduce cloud storage prices. Launch new cloud services. Competition - is good for customers. On Monday, Google reduced prices for its Google Cloud Storage by over 20%, and today, in response, Amazon has reduced prices for its S3 storage by 25%. Obviously, in the near future, Microsoft will also reduce prices for Windows Azure, to bring them to the competitive level - about $0.09/month per GB. The same story occured in March when Amazon lowered prices, and then Microsoft and Google aligned their pricing with Amazon. Because on the cloud platforms market the price is no longer a competitive advantage, but your pricing is higher than the competition - is't a big disadvantage. Some experts already doubt that Amazon and the contenders are earning something on selling gigabytes and gigahertzs. Like in case with the mobile market, the main task of cloud vendors - is to hook up large companies and SaaS-providers to their platforms, even if they should sell computing resources at a loss.



2012. Amazon Glacier: Cloud storage service using Humanoid robots. Humanoid robots - is just our assumption, but it's first idea, that comes to mind when looking at the new service Amazon Glacier. This is a solution for the long-term storage of archives and backups, which are needed for business very rare, or may be never used, but should be stored because of some state or corporate guidelines. The point is that storing data in Amazon Glacier is very cheap. Only 1 cent per month for 1 GB (10 times less than in the Amazon S3). But if you want to get any file - you need to order it first and wait 3-5 hours until it becomes available. (We think that during this time the robot can find the hard drive in the data center and bring it to the control panel). In addition, Amazon Glacier customers will be able to download only 5% of their data per month and will pay $0.12 per GB for data transfer exceeding 1 GB per month.



2012. OpenStack launches. CloudStack departs. Amazon adapts SAP. Azure rebrands. Here is the news digest from the leading cloud platforms. First of all, the open-source platform OpenStack (aka Linux for the clouds) which had been developed for two years by the alliance of IT giants (Rackspace, NASA, Citrix, Intel, AMD, Cisco, Dell, HP, IBM ...) - finally comes to production. Since May 1, it was adapted by RackSpace for its service Rackspace Cloud Files and last week HP launched the public beta of its HP Cloud platform, based on OpenStack. However, a week before the launch the trouble (common for open-source projects) occurred with OpenStack. Citrix, which has been one of the first participants in OpenStack, suddenly decided to grant its own cloud platform - CloudStack - to Apache Software Foundation. Thus, CloudStack not flowed into OpenStack but became a rival project. Citrix explained this decision by the slow OpenStack development and unwillingness of other parties to integrate with Amazon Web Services APIs.



2012. AWS Marketplace - cloud app market for Amazon's platform. Better than anybody in the world Amazon can build online stores, so the launch of the cloud app store for Amazon Web Services platform - is very logical move. The question may be only one: what's the point of creating software store for AWS, if AWS can host almost any software in the world? The fact is that AWS Marketplace sells not software but software images, specially created for the AWS (so-called AMI = Amazon Machine Images). Each image in addition to the software contains everything it needs to run (operating system, middleware). And you can install such AMI on Amazon's server with just one click. You do not need to configure the software - everything works out-of-the-box. Thus, developers and IT administrators need less and less brains to start using Amazon's cloud platform. You just need to create an account, go to the app store, add to cart needed software (from the operating system to CRM system) and that's all.



2012. Amazon wants to beat Google in the Enterprise Search. Enterprise search engines (which are used mostly by large companies with large data stores) - have always been the prerogative of the large software vendors: SAP, Oracle, IBM, Open Text. Then, of course, the search giant Google came to party and became market leader. But now Google and company will face a new competitor. Amazon is launching a new service on its cloud platform - CloudSearch. At first glance, it seems that Google has nothing to fear. Even though Amazon developers have some experience in search technologies (they somehow developed a search engine for the online store and even launched the own search engine A9). But how can they compete with Google? The problem is that existing enterprise search engines, including Google Enterprise Search, are designed for work in local networks, on local servers. And as corporate data moves to the cloud, they become useless.



2012. So Amazon is #1. And who’s next in cloud computing?. GigaOm has published the list of top 7 cloud providers besides Amazon. Why besides Amazon? Because Amazon Web Services for now is far ahead of competitors. AWS is an absolute cloud market leader in all reports of all analytical firms. According to various estimates, AWS runs on 450,000 servers and generates about $1 billion in revenue per year. And who's next? Here are the top 7 the cloud providers by GigaOM:



2012. Amazon - gets closer to Windows, OpenStack - closer to Linux. The situation on the cloud (IaaS) platform market more and more reminds us the history of the desktop operating systems (Windows and Linux). On the one hand - open and standard-based platform OpenStack. It's standards this week were supported by two more giants - IBM and Ericsson, that joined the OpenStack alliance. Before them the alliance included Rackspace, Citrix, Intel, AMD, Cisco, Dell, HP. On the other hand - proprietary but already very popular platform Amazon Web Services (AWS). AWS gained it's popularity as a simple and open platform which allows to restore Linux or Windows server and scale it depending on the load. It was relatively easy to move applications of AWS. But as Amazon adds new features to AWS, it lockes clients and partners more and more in its golden cage.


Google App Engine for Business
2011. Google killed App Engine for Business. Last month, at the Google I/O conference, Google announced changes in GAE pricing, and caused panic among the developers. Without going into details, we'll just say that the developers initially incorrectly calculated the new fees, and only after Google's clarification post, it became clear that the prices would jump, but not so much. However, in the shadow of this panic another small announcement was unnoticed - the enterprise version of Google App Engine, launched a year ago - was closed. This does not mean that Google is no longer positioning its PaaS platform for business. Most of the features of the enterprise version (99.95% SLA, support for SSL, SQL, Spring framework) will be soon implemented in the basic version. However, this means that Google has done a lot of mistakes with the PaaS platform and currently loosing the game in competition with Microsoft, Salesforce, Amazon, VMWare.


Amazon Elastic Beanstalk
2011. Amazon enters PaaS market. Takes on Google, Microsoft and Salesforce. As known, Amazon Web Services - is the leader of IaaS market. It's the service that allows you to rent computing resources for enterprise software or SaaS service hosting. And using it you reserve the required number of servers, configure operating system, install and configure middleware, enable/disable servers depending on the load. This is called IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service). But honestly, IaaS - it's not perfect. In most cases, companies and SaaS providers would not want to handle these servers and other infrastructure themselves. All they want - is that their application worked properly on any load. And they don't care what is under the hood of the cloud platform. This is the primary idea of competing technology - PaaS (Platform as a Service). And it is logical that PaaS platforms are gradually displacing IaaS.


Amazon Web Services
2010. Amazon Web Services: Free version for startups. Amazon is getting serious in attracting startups to its cloud platform. Recently the company opened a budget-friendly service Amazon Micro Instances that is even more affordable than the traditional VPS hosting. And today Amazon announced that starting November 1 this service will be available for free to new customers during the first year. One year is enough for a startup to make a decision - either the project is viable and it's worth to invest money in it, or it can be dropped. For this year startup is given a free Linux-server with one processor and 613 MB of RAM, 10 GB disk space (Amazon EBS), 5 GB online storage (Amazon S3). You can find the full list of free resources here. Recall that Google App Engine also provides free cloud hosting for startups, but it has the significant limitations of available programming languages.


Amazon Web Services
2010. Amazon EC2 makes Cloud Computing affordable for all. Takes on Rackspace. Until now, the minimum virtual server (instance) on Amazon EC2 with configuration 1.7 GB RAM / 160 GB - cost 8.5 cents per hour (approximately $61 per month). This amount seemed quite large for most small businesses using web-apps and SaaS startups and kept them from switching from a traditional hosting (or own servers) to the cloud technologies. Some people used Rackspace, which provides the less powerful instances - from 11$ / month for the configuration 256 MB / 10 GB. But today even the most budget conscious small businesses and SaaS startups got the good reason to join the Cloud Computing era, and Rackspace got a new headache - Amazon Micro Instances.


2010. Amazon moves own IT-infrastructure to the cloud. It sounds strange, but the IT director of Amazon (the leading cloud platfrom provider) Jennifer Boden is not a fan of cloud computing, like her boss, Jeff Bezos. She looks at the cloud carefully and rationally. That is why, the Amazon's IT infrastructure is still moved to AWS only partially. Moreover, the company did not move in this direction until last year when Amazon VPC (Virtual Private Cloud), which allows to separate an enterprise cloud from the public cloud, appeared. Nevertheless, the process is started, and now Jennifer is speaking at the IT event with the presentation (see above) about how Amazon moves to Cloud Computing. Note that it this concerns not the Amazon's online store but the in-house enterprise apps, like email, financial software, IT management, HRM, etc.


Google App Engine
2010. Google partners with VMWare to adopt GAE for Enterprise. In response to the recent launch of VMForce, Google today announced the upcoming version of its cloud platform for enterprise users - Google App Engine for Business. Until now, GAE was actually not suitable for hosting enterprise applications. First, GAE does not provides enterprise-ready support, security and service level guarantees. Besides, it supports only one database - Big Table, which is not used in existing business applications, and locks clients into one platform. The enterprise version of GAE, which is scheduled for 4 quarter of 2010, will fix these issues. Corporate customers will be offered a premium support, 99.9% SLA, administration panel for managing security policies. In addition, GAE will add support for SSL and SQL databases. Instead of difficult-to-forecast scheme of payment for computer resources, the clients will pay a flat rate - $8/month for app user.